Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Psychotic symptoms in young people without psychotic illness: mechanisms and meaning

  • Graham K. Murray (a1) and Peter B. Jones (a2)
Summary

Psychotic symptoms are common in the general population. There is evidence for common mechanisms underlying such symptoms in health and illness (such as the functional role of mesocorticostriatal circuitry in error-dependent learning) and differentiating factors (relating to non-psychotic features of psychotic illness and to social and emotional aspects of psychotic symptoms). Clinicians should be aware that psychotic symptoms in young people are more often associated with common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety than with severe psychotic illness.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Psychotic symptoms in young people without psychotic illness: mechanisms and meaning
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Psychotic symptoms in young people without psychotic illness: mechanisms and meaning
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Psychotic symptoms in young people without psychotic illness: mechanisms and meaning
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Graham Murray, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Box 189 Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, UK. Email: gm285@cam.ac.uk
Footnotes
Hide All

See pp. 26–32, this issue.

G.K.M. is supported by a Medical Research Council Clinician Scientist award; P.B.J. acknowledges support from the NIMR BRC for Cambridge.

Declaration of interest

P.B.J. sat on a scientific advisory board for Roche in 2011, and directs the NIHR CLAHRC for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Kelleher, I, Keeley, H, Corcoran, P, Lynch, F, Fitzpatrick, C, Devlin, N, et al. Clinicopathological significance of psychotic symptoms in non-psychotic young people: evidence from four population-based studies. Br J Psychiatry 2012; 201: 2632.
2 Varghese, D, Scott, J, Welham, J, Bor, W, Najman, J, O'Callaghan, M, et al. Psychotic-like experiences in major depression and anxiety disorders: a population-based survey in young adults. Schizophr Bull 2011; 37: 389–93.
3 Woodward, ND, Cowan, RL, Park, S, Ansari, MS, Baldwin, RM, Li, R, et al. Correlation of individual differences in schizotypal personality traits with amphetamine-induced dopamine release in striatal and extrastriatal brain regions. Am J Psychiatry 2011; 168: 418–26.
4 Howes, OD, Shotbolt, P, Bloomfield, M, Daalman, K, Demjaha, A, Diederen, KM, et al. Dopaminergic function in the psychosis spectrum: an [18F]-DOPA imaging study in healthy individuals with auditory hallucinations. Schizophr Bull 2012; Jan 26 (Epub ahead of print).
5 Fletcher, PC, Frith, CD. Perceiving is believing: a Bayesian approach to explaining the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Nat Rev Neurosci 2009; 10: 4858.
6 Murray, GK, Corlett, PR, Clark, L, Pessiglione, M, Blackwell, AD, Honey, G, et al. Substantia nigra/ventral tegmental reward prediction error disruption in psychosis. Mol Psychiatry 2008; 13: 267–76.
7 Corlett, PR, Honey, GD, Aitken, MR, Dickinson, A, Shanks, DR, Absalom, AR, et al. Frontal responses during learning predict vulnerability to the psychotogenic effects of ketamine: linking cognition, brain activity, and psychosis. Arch Gen Psychiatry 2006; 63: 611–21.
8 Freeman, D. Delusions in the nonclinical population. Curr Psychiatry Rep 2006; 8: 191204.
9 Johnstone, EC, Russell, KD, Harrison, LK, Lawrie, SM. The Edinburgh High Risk Study: current status and future prospects. World Psychiatry 2003; 2: 45–9.
10 Kaymaz, N, Drukker, M, Lieb, R, Wittchen, HU, Werbeloff, N, Weiser, M, et al. Do subthreshold psychotic experiences predict clinical outcomes in unselected non-help-seeking population-based samples? A systematic review and meta-analysis, enriched with new results. Psychol Med 2012; Jan 20: 115 (Epub ahead of print).
11 Berrios, GE. The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology since the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press, 1996.
12 Petersen, L, Jeppesen, P, Thorup, A, Abel, MB, Ohlenschlaeger, J, Christensen, TO, et al. A randomised multicentre trial of integrated versus standard treatment for patients with a first episode of psychotic illness. BMJ 2005; 331: 602.
13 Morrison, AP, French, P, Stewart, SL, Birchwood, M, Fowler, D, Gumley, AI, et al. Early detection and intervention evaluation for people at risk of psychosis: multisite randomised controlled trial. BMJ 2012; 344: e2233.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 37 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 116 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 3rd January 2018 - 25th April 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Psychotic symptoms in young people without psychotic illness: mechanisms and meaning

  • Graham K. Murray (a1) and Peter B. Jones (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *