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Security of mind: 20 years of attachment theory and its relevance to psychiatry

  • Gwen Adshead (a1)
Summary

In this editorial, I suggest that no psychiatrist should be without a working knowledge of attachment theory, and it is a capability that all trainees should cover in the proposed new curriculum. I have focused on three domains of research to argue that attachment theory is relevant to practicing psychiatrists.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Corresponding author
Correspondence: Dr Gwen Adshead, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Hampshire Pathfinder Service, Ravenswood House, Mayles lane, Fareham, Hampshire PO17 5NA, UK. Email: g.adshead@nhs.net
References
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  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Security of mind: 20 years of attachment theory and its relevance to psychiatry

  • Gwen Adshead (a1)
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