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Self-injury attendances in the accident and emergency department: Clinical database study

  • Judith Horrocks (a1), Sally Price (a1), Allan House (a2) and David Owens (a3)
Abstract
Background

Self-injury is a neglected area of self-harm research and we know little about its epidemiology, hospital care and outcome.

Aims

To provide epidemiological data on self-injury and compare hospital management of self-injury with that for self-poisoning.

Method

Data were collected on all self-harm attendances to the general hospitals in Leeds over an 18-month period.

Results

People attending hospital for self-injury or self-poisoning do not form mutually exclusive groups. There were higher proportions of self-injury episodes compared with self-poisoning, where a history of self-harm or contact with mental health services had been recorded. Fewer psychosocial assessments were carried out after episodes of self-injury compared with self-poisoning but, when they were, follow-up was recommended more often.

Conclusions

The clinical importance of self-injury is not mirrored by the level of psychosocial assessment and after-care provided.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Allan House, Academic Unit of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, University of Leeds, 15 Hyde Terrace, Leeds LS2 9LT, UK
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

J.H.'s salary was paid for by the mental health charity Leeds MIND from a research grant awarded by the UK National Lottery Charities Board and from a research grant awarded by Leeds Community and Mental Health Trust.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Self-injury attendances in the accident and emergency department: Clinical database study

  • Judith Horrocks (a1), Sally Price (a1), Allan House (a2) and David Owens (a3)
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