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Severe and enduring mental health problems within an established substance misuse treatment partnership

  • Kathryn Walsh (a1) and Alex Copello (a1) (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

The study reports findings of an investigation into the presence of severe and enduring mental health problems within the four statutory and non-statutory teams of an established substance misuse treatment partnership.

Results

Of a total of 772 clients in the four teams surveyed, 69 (8.9%) were identified as having severe and enduring mental health problems and problem substance use in the past 12 months. Alcohol was the most prevalent substance used by this predominantly male group. Different rates were found across the four teams, with higher numbers in the non-statutory teams. The clients displayed significant levels of self-harm and suicide risk and were responsible for 131 acute service contacts over the past 12 months.

Clinical implications

Clients with severe and enduring mental health problems engaged with substance misuse services display high levels of complex need. It is important to identify the best and most effective service response to this group.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Kathryn Walsh (k.walsh@bham.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2053-4868
  • EISSN: 2053-4876
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Severe and enduring mental health problems within an established substance misuse treatment partnership

  • Kathryn Walsh (a1) and Alex Copello (a1) (a2)
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