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Early termination of cognitive-behavioural interventions: literature review

  • Alberto Salmoiraghi (a1) (a2) and Rajvinder Sambhi (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

The evidence of the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural interventions is well established. Despite this, clinicians often face a consistent number of not attended appointments or early treatment discontinuation rates. This paper reviews the literature to date regarding the possible causes of early termination of cognitive-behavioural interventions. A literature search was done using Medline, PsycINFO, Embase and the Cochrane Library.

Results

We reviewed 14 articles. Out of these, two were randomised controlled trials, one was a controlled trial and the rest were cohort studies. Drop-out was defined differently across papers. There are many factors that may affect early treatment discontinuation rates and they are described individually.

Clinical implications

There does not appear to be a single strong predictor of early treatment discontinuation. Specific literature relating to cognitive-behavioural therapy is scarce. However, some factors such as young age, education level and psychopathology appear to be more strongly associated with early treatment discontinuation than others.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Alberto Salmoiraghi (alberto.salmoiraghi@wales.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Early termination of cognitive-behavioural interventions: literature review

  • Alberto Salmoiraghi (a1) (a2) and Rajvinder Sambhi (a1)
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