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Experience of support time and recovery workers in promoting WRAP

  • Laura Hill (a1), Glenn Roberts (a1) and Wilson Igbrude (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

Supporting self-management is a core ambition of progressive mental health services, but little is known about how to achieve this. Support time and recovery (STaR) workers are routinely taught the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP). This study explores their capacity to support self-management using WRAP.

Results

The audited STaR trainees had introduced an average of nine service users each to WRAP. There was a trend for those with personal experience of mental illness to introduce more clients to WRAP and even more so for those who had used WRAP themselves. Qualitative analysis suggested a range of factors that may mediate whether people engage with self-management or not.

Clinical implications

The capacity of STaR workers and others to support people in self-management may depend on more than knowledge of self-management methods and having personal experience of mental health problems and services. Important factors may also include specific experience of the methods introduced, ongoing training, accountability and supervision.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Glenn Roberts (glenn.roberts@devonptnrs.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Experience of support time and recovery workers in promoting WRAP

  • Laura Hill (a1), Glenn Roberts (a1) and Wilson Igbrude (a2)
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eLetters

A Fishy Business

Larry Culliford, Author (retired psychiatrist)
18 August 2010

Has anyone else noticed that the epigram at the start of this paper ("Give a man a fish", etc.) is incorrectly attributed? It does not expressa Taoist idea, and is not the kind of thing Lao Tsu would have written. Unfortunately, I have not been able to locate the original source. For example, it does not appear in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (where 20 reliable quotes from Lao Tsu are listed). At least one website also wrongly lists Lao Tsu as the author, and another refers to the quotation as a Chinese Proverb, but a third calls it an English Proverb.(I've been wondering if the original author might actually have been contemporary, anOxfam official for instance.)I have checked again through Lao Tsu's 'Tao Te Ching', the only work of his that survives. "Give a man a fish..." definitely does not appear. Indeed,the only (sole) reference to fish comes in Chapter 60: "Governing a large country is like frying a small fish; you spoil it if you poke it around too much". It occurs to me that a number of politicians, including particularly the Secretary of State for Health, might wisely take note of that point. What are the chances of them taking the bait? ... More

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