Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Smoking and people with mental illness

  • Pratish B. Thakkar (a1), Jose Garcia (a2) and Leslie Burton (a3)
  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Smoking and people with mental illness
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Smoking and people with mental illness
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Smoking and people with mental illness
      Available formats
      ×
Abstract
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
Hide All
1 Cormac, I, Creasey, S, McNeill, A, Ferriter, M, Huckstep, B, D'Silva, K. Impact of a total smoking ban in a high secure hospital. Psychiatrist 2010; 34: 413–7.
2 Faculty of Public Health. Mental Health and Smoking: A Position Statement. Faculty of Public Health, 2008.
3 Action on Smoking and Health Fact Sheets. Smoking Statistics: Who Smokes and How Much. ASH, 2010 (www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_106.pdf).
4 Robinson, S, Bugler, C. General Lifestyle Survey 2008: Smoking and Drinking among Adults, 2008. Office for National Statistics, 2010.
5 Campion, J, Checinski, K, Nurse, J. Review of smoking cessation treatments for people with mental illness. Adv Psychiatr Treat 2008; 14: 208–16.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 9 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 52 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 18th August 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Smoking and people with mental illness

  • Pratish B. Thakkar (a1), Jose Garcia (a2) and Leslie Burton (a3)
Submit a response

eLetters

Smoking in psychiatric wards in Scotland

Eugene K O Wong, ST3 Psychiatry
05 May 2011

We write in response to Thakkar, Garcia and Burton’s letter (1). Despite the ban on smoking in public places in Scotland by virtue of the Smoking, Health and Social Care (Scotland) Act 2005, some psychiatric wards remain exempt from this ban due to a loophole allowing patients to smoke in designated indoor rooms. The difficulty in persuading both staff and patients to move towards smoke-free mental health wards is somewhat understandable, given the general perception that smoking relieves boredomand acts as an anxiolytic. There is evidence to the contrary (2).

We did a similar survey on all patients aged 16-65 within the acute psychiatric wards in our trust (NHS Forth Valley). Interestingly, the percentage of smokers in our wards were also much higher than the nationalaverage (76% vs. 21%). Looking into the longer term, 53% of these patientswere keen to remain abstinent after discharge. We then used this data to estimate the costs of providing support with smoking cessation within our trust based on data on the number of admissions and the average length of stay, taking into account all pharmacological and psychological treatment options available.

Moving towards a smoke-free environment is something of a paradigm change that costs money to implement (£42,683 was estimated for our Trust). Nevertheless, this is a but small price to pay as we move towards equality and the destigmatization of psychiatric patients, who have an equal right to better physical health!

References

1. Thakkar P B, Garcia J, Burton L. Smoking and people with mental illness (correspondence). Psychiatrist 2011; 35: 30.

2. Scottish Government (2011). Smoke‐free mental health services in Scotland Implementation guidance. 1. ed. Edinburgh: NHS HealthScotland.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

Smoking and the health of psychiatric in-patients

Suzy Ker, Consultant psychiatrist, Harrogate
09 February 2011

We read Thakkar, Garcia and Burton’s letter (1) with interest. We carried out a similar survey enquiring about the smoking habits of inpatients on the General Adult wards of a psychiatric hospital in York (2) before the hospital closed each ward’s smoking room. We too were concerned to discover that the majority of patients (56%) were smokers andthat the majority of these (63%) reported smoking more after admission than in the week before hospitalisation. In keeping with Thakkar et al’s findings, we discovered that the main reason given for smoking more was boredom, with other key reasons being stress and the wish to socialise.

Rather more heartening was our finding that 17% of the smokers surveyed reported smoking less after admission, citing improvement in mental state and a dislike of the smoking areas as the main reasons.

Unlike in Thakkar et al’s survey, our inpatients did not think their smoking habits had changed because of medication side-effects.

We also felt that the issue of inpatient boredom should be addressed through active management of the ward environment and that our services should be better advocates of smoking cessation. There is the hope that the recent smoke-free legislation will lead to substantially lowered tobacco consumption in the general population. If so, it will become more important than ever for psychiatric wards to be activity-focused places. Some hospitals have improved the ward environment through hard work and investment; if such change for the better is not widespread then the physical health of people with mental illness who require hospital care – but experience it in a tedious, activity-free ward environment thatfinds them increasing their smoking habit – will drift further than ever from that of the rest of the population.

References1. Thakkar P B, Garcia J, Burton L. Smoking and people with mental illness (correspondence). Psychiatrist 2011; 35: 30.

2. Ker S, Owens D. Admission to a psychiatric unit and changes in tobacco smoking. Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health 2008; 4:12.
... More

Conflict of interest: None Declared

Write a reply

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *