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The Coming Water Crisis: A Common Concern of Humankind

  • Edith Brown Weiss (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

This essay argues that fresh water, its availability and use, should now be recognized as ‘a common concern of humankind’, much as climate change was recognized as a ‘common concern of humankind’ in the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and conservation of biodiversity was recognized as a ‘common concern of humankind’ in the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity. This would respond to the many linkages between what happens in one area with the demand for and the supply of fresh water in other areas. It would take into account the scientific characteristics of the hydrological cycle, address the growing commodification of water in the form of transboundary water markets and virtual water transfers through food production and trade, and respect the efforts to identify a human right to water.

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D. Grey & C. Sadoff , ‘Sink or Swim? Water Security for Growth and Development’, (2007) 9(6) Water Policy, pp. 545–71.

K. Deininger & D. Byerlee , with J. Lindsay , A. Norton , H. Selod & M. Stickle , Rising Global Interest in Farmland: Can It Yield Sustainable and Equitable Benefits? (World Bank, 2011).

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Transnational Environmental Law
  • ISSN: 2047-1025
  • EISSN: 2047-1033
  • URL: /core/journals/transnational-environmental-law
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