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Feeling of Cold Hands and Feet is a Highly Heritable Phenotype

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2012

Yoon-Mi Hur*
Affiliation:
Mokpo National University, South Korea
Jeong-Ho Chae
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea
Ki Wha Chung
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Science, Kongju National University, South Korea
Jung Jin Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea
Hoe-Uk Jeong
Affiliation:
Mokpo National University, South Korea
Jong Woo Kim
Affiliation:
College of Oriental Medicine, Kyunghee University Hospital, South Korea
Sung Yum Seo
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Science, Kongju National University, South Korea
Kyung Soo Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea
*
Address for Correspondence: Yoon-Mi Hur, Mokpo National University, 61 Dorim-ri, Muan-gun, Jeonnam, South Korea. Email: ymhur@mokpo.ac.kr

Abstract

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The prevalence of the feeling of cold hands and feet (FCHF) is high in the general population but the etiology of FCHF is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore whether the FCHF is heritable. Eight hundred and ninety-four pairs of twins completed a question about FCHF. Tetrachoric correlations for FCHF were .58, .29, .67, .52, and .04 for monozygotic male, dizygotic male, monozygotic female, and dizygotic female twins, respectively. Model-fitting analyses suggested that in the best fitting model, additive genetic and nonshared environmental variance including measurement error were 64% (95% CI: 55%-72%) and 36% (28%-45%), respectively. Sex differences in genetic and environmental influences were not significant.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012