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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Grjibovski, Andrej M. Harris, Jennifer R. and Magnus, Per 2005. Birthweight and Adult Health in a Population-Based Sample of Norwegian Twins. Twin Research and Human Genetics, Vol. 8, Issue. 02, p. 148.


    Tuya, Chuluuntulga Mutch, William J. Broom, Iain Campbell, Doris M. and McNeill, Geraldine 2003. Size at Birth, Fasting Glucose and Insulin Levels and Insulin Resistance in Adult Twins. Twin Research, Vol. 6, Issue. 4, p. 302.


    Brix, Thomas Heiberg Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm and Hegedüs, Laszlo 2002. Association Between Birth Weight and Adult Disorders in Twins: Validity of Self-reported Birth Weight. Twin Research, Vol. 5, Issue. 04, p. 308.


    James, William H. 2002. Birthweight in Dizygotic Twins. Twin Research, Vol. 5, Issue. 04, p. 309.


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The Foetal Origins of Adult Disease: Interpreting the Evidence From Twin Studies

  • David A. Leon (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/twin.4.5.321
  • Published online: 01 February 2012
Abstract
Abstract

Twin studies have a contribution to make to the debate concerning the foetal origins of adult disease. Twins are growth retarded compared to singletons and experience post-natal catch-up growth. However, there is no evidence that twins are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Studying whether discordance in size at birth within monozygotic twin pairs is predictive of discordance in later life disease should help resolve whether the association between size at birth and later disease is due to common genetic factors. Results from studies of blood pressure in childhood and adult life looking at these within twin effects are far from conclusive. There are, however, methodological problems in the interpretation of these results, not least of which is the relatively small numbers of twin pairs studied. Studies exploring the effect of zygosity and chorion type on later disease provide may provide a useful extension of the research agenda. In summary, twin studies to date have raised more questions about the foetal origins hypothesis than they have resolved.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: David A. Leon, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel St, London WC1E 7HT, The United Kingdom.
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Twin Research and Human Genetics
  • ISSN: 1832-4274
  • EISSN: 1839-2628
  • URL: /core/journals/twin-research-and-human-genetics
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