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The topography of seventeenth-century London: a review of maps*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2009

Extract

Since the mid-sixteenth century London has received attention from many map-makers and publishers. Before the arrival of the Ordnance Survey, however, only a handful of London maps are both topographically reliable (in terms of contemporary technical ability) and based on original surveys. These are: the lost mid-Tudor copper-engraved map, original of the so-called ‘Agas’ woodcut map, Hollar's uncompleted map of 1661–6, Rocque's maps of London and its environs of the 1740s, and the two post-Fire maps considered here. Of this group only ‘Agas’ and Rocque's maps are familiar and fairly widely used by historians, although, one has to say, more often as book-illustrations for their ornamental and quaint character than for the information they give.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1980

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Footnotes

*

A Large and Accurate Map of the City of London—John Ogilby and William Morgan: 1676 in 21 Sheets, with An Explanation of the Map—John Ogilby: 1677 (Harry Margary, 1976); and London Etc. Actually Surveyed—including, A Prospect of London and Westminster—Taken at several Stations to the Southward thereof—William Morgan: 1681/2 in 16 sheets. (Harry Margary, 1977).

Both maps are published in several formats, the cheapest, in sets of loose sheets, being £7.50 (Ogilby and Morgan) plus £3.50 for a bound copy of Ogilby's Explanation, and £10.00 for Morgan's London Etc., to be ordered direct from Harry Margary, Lympne Castle, Kent.

References

* A Large and Accurate Map of the City of London—John Ogilby and William Morgan: 1676 in 21 Sheets, with An Explanation of the Map—John Ogilby: 1677 (Harry Margary, 1976); and London Etc. Actually Surveyed—including, A Prospect of London and Westminster—Taken at several Stations to the Southward thereof—William Morgan: 1681/2 in 16 sheets. (Harry Margary, 1977).

Both maps are published in several formats, the cheapest, in sets of loose sheets, being £7.50 (Ogilby and Morgan) plus £3.50 for a bound copy of Ogilby's Explanation, and £10.00 for Morgan's London Etc., to be ordered direct from Harry Margary, Lympne Castle, Kent.

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