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Some Difficult Intuitions for the Principle of Universality

  • STEPHEN KERSHNAR (a1)
Abstract

The Principle of Universality asserts that a part retains its intrinsic value regardless of the whole in which it is a part or even whether it is part of a whole. The idea underlying this principle is that the intrinsic value of a thing supervenes on its intrinsic properties. Since the intrinsic properties remain unchanged so does the thing's intrinsic value. In this article, I argue that, properly understood, the Principle of Universality can handle seemingly troublesome intuitions about the relative intrinsic value of a vicious person having pain and his having pleasure. I specifically argue that the intuition that the former state is better is explained by the nature of the basic intrinsic-value states, which involve a person having a level of well-being and desert at a time. One implication of this is that given the nature of such basic intrinsic-value states, pleasure and pain are not value-bearing parts of virtuous and vicious attitudes.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

N. Lemos , Intrinsic Value: Concept and Warrant (New York, 1994), pp. 40–7

C. Korsgaard , Creating the Kingdom of Ends (Cambridge, 1996)

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Utilitas
  • ISSN: 0953-8208
  • EISSN: 1741-6183
  • URL: /core/journals/utilitas
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