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  • Jesse Cordes Selbin
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Notes

1. Ellis, Sarah Stickney, “The Art of Reading Well, As Connected with Social Improvement,” in The Young Ladies’ Reader; or, Extracts from Modern Authors, ed. Ellis, Sarah Stickney (London: Grant and Griffith, 1845), 1.

2. Warner, Michael, “Uncritical Reading,” in Polemic: Critical or Uncritical, ed. Gallop, Jane (New York: Routledge, 2004), 20. For a more recent take on this question, see Allan, Michael, In the Shadow of World Literature: Sites of Reading in Colonial Egypt (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016).

3. Kramnick, Jonathan and Nersessian, Anahid, “Form and Explanation,” Critical Inquiry 43 (Spring 2017): 650–69.

4. See, for instance, Flint, Kate, The Woman Reader, 1837–1914 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993); Dames, Nicholas, The Physiology of the Novel: Reading, Neural Science, and the Form of Victorian Fiction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007); Lynch, Deidre Shauna, Loving Literature: A Cultural History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015).

5. Blanche Leppington, “Ivanhoe,” National Home Reading Union Monthly Journal, January 4, 1890, 35; Geraldine Jewsbury, unsigned review [The Moonstone], Athenaeum, July 25, 1868, 106

6. Radford, George, The Faculty of Reading: The Coming of Age of the National Home Reading Union (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1910), 21.

7. S. M. Amos, “Biographies of Working Men,” National Home Reading Union Monthly Journal, Artizans’ Section, January 4, 1890, 39.

8. John Cassell, “Rules for Reading,” The Working Man's Friend and Family Instructor, January 12, 1850, 61.

9. Harrison, Frederic, Autobiographic Memoirs (London: Macmillan and Co., 1911), 327.

10. Ablow, Rachel, “Introduction,” in The Feeling of Reading: Affective Experience and Victorian Literature, ed. Ablow, Rachel (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2010), 4.

11. Trench, Richard Chevenix, On the Study of Words (1851; New York: A. C. Armstrong, 1885), 19.

12. Mozley, Anne, “On Fiction as an Educator,” Blackwood's Magazine 108 (1870): 449–59.

13. Soulsby, Lucy H. M., Stray Thoughts on Reading (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1897).

14. Welldon, J. E. C., “The Art of Reading Books,” National Review (April 1894): 213–18, 215, 216.

15. Helps, Arthur, Friends in Council: A Series of Readings and Discourse Thereon, Vol. 2 (London: Pickering, 1847), 10.

16. Smith, Sydney, Wit and Wisdom of the Rev. Sydney Smith (New York: Widdleton, 1856), 209.

17. Cassell, John, untitled introduction, in The Working Man's Friend and Family Instructor, Supplementary Number (March 1850): 1; and Fitch, J. G., “The Chautauqua Reading Circle,” The Nineteenth Century 24 (July–Dec. 1888): 487500, 489.

18. John Cassell, “How to Read Profitably,” The Working Man's Friend and Family Instructor, August 3, 1850, 120–24, 123.

19. Radford, Faculty of Reading, 8.

20. Fitch, “Chautauqua Reading Circle,” 489.

21. Qtd. in Snape, Robert, “National Home Reading Union,” Journal of Victorian Culture 7, no. 1 (2002): 86110, 93.

22. Price, Leah, “Victorian Reading,” in The Cambridge History of Victorian Literature, ed. Flint, Kate (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012), 34.

23. See, for instance, McGann, Jerome, “Recitation Considered as a Fine Art,” Experimental Literary Education, English Language Notes 47, no. 1 (2009): 181–83; Culler, Jonathan, “The Closeness of Close Reading,” ADE Bulletin 149 (2010): 2025; Robson, Catherine, Heart Beats: Everyday Life and the Memorized Poem (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2012).

24. For a concise illustration of how major Victorian reading theories press upon this distinction in relevant and productive ways, see Arata, Stephen, “Literature and Information,” PMLA 130, no. 3 (2015): 673–78, especially 677.

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Victorian Literature and Culture
  • ISSN: 1060-1503
  • EISSN: 1470-1553
  • URL: /core/journals/victorian-literature-and-culture
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