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Clomazone and Starter Nitrogen Fertilizer Effects on Growth and Yield of Hybrid and Inbred Rice Cultivars

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2017

Bobby R. Golden
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research Associate II, Research/Extension Professor, Research Associate, and Former Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776
Benjamin H. Lawrence
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research Associate II, Research/Extension Professor, Research Associate, and Former Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776
Jason A. Bond
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research Associate II, Research/Extension Professor, Research Associate, and Former Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776
H. Matthew Edwards
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research Associate II, Research/Extension Professor, Research Associate, and Former Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776
Timothy W. Walker
Affiliation:
Associate Extension/Research Professor, Research Associate II, Research/Extension Professor, Research Associate, and Former Research/Extension Professor, Delta Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 38776
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Cultivar and/or application of early-season (starter) nitrogen (N) fertilizer may influence rice tolerance to clomazone. Field studies were conducted to compare the response of hybrid and inbred rice cultivars to applications of clomazone and starter N fertilizer treatments. The inbred cultivar ‘Cocodrie’ and the hybrid cultivar ‘XL723’ were treated with clomazone at 0, 420, or 672 g ai ha−1 immediately after seeding, and starter N fertilizer was applied at 0 or 24 kg N ha−1 when rice reached the two-leaf growth stage. Pooled across clomazone rates and starter N fertilizer treatments, height of Cocodrie 1 week after emergence (WAE) was greater than that of XL723 in 1 of 3 yr. The difference in height between Cocodrie and XL723 resulted from greater clomazone injury 1 WAE on XL723 compared with Cocodrie. No differences in rice height 3 WAE were detected between Cocodrie and XL723 in 2 of 3 yr. when data were pooled across clomazone rates and starter N fertilizer treatments. Injury 3 WAE was similar for Cocodrie across the 3 yr., but injury on XL723 was greater in 1 of 3 yr. Rough rice yield was lower in plots treated with either rate of clomazone where no starter N fertilizer treatment was applied; however, in plots receiving a starter N fertilizer treatment, no effect of clomazone rate on rough rice yield was observed. Clomazone rate did not influence rough rice yield of Cocodrie in any single yr., but rough rice yields of XL723 were lower in plots receiving clomazone compared with plots that received no clomazone in 1 of 3 yr. Therefore, differential susceptibility to clomazone between Cocodrie and XL723 exists based on early-season response and rough rice yield. Starter N fertilizer treatments were beneficial for overcoming yield reductions due to clomazone injury.

El cultivar y/o la aplicación de fertilizante de nitrógeno (N) temprano en la temporada (inicial) podría influenciar la tolerancia del arroz a clomazone. Se realizaron estudios de campo para comparar la respuesta de cultivares de arroz híbridos y endógamos a aplicaciones de tratamientos con clomazone y fertilizante N inicial. El cultivar endógamo ‘Cocodrie’ y el cultivar híbrido ‘XL723’ fueron tratados con clomazone a 0, 420, ó 672 g ai ha−1 inmediatamente después de la siembra, y el fertilizante N inicial fue aplicado a 0 y 24 kg N ha−1 cuando el arroz alcanzó el estadio de crecimiento de dos hojas. Promediando las dosis de clomazone y los tratamientos de fertilizante inicial, la altura de Cocodrie 1 semana después de la emergencia (WAE) fue mayor que la de XL723 en 1 de 3 años. La diferencia en la altura entre Cocodrie y XL721 fue producto de un mayor daño 1 WAE en XL723 que con Cocodrie. No se detectaron diferencias en la altura del arroz 3 WAE entre Cocodrie y XL723 en 2 de 3 años cuando se promediaron las dosis de clomazone y los tratamientos de fertilizante N inicial. El daño 3 WAE fue similar para Cocodrie durante los tres años, pero el daño de XL723 fue mayor en 1 de 3 años. El rendimiento del arroz en granza fue menor en parcelas tratadas con cualquiera de las dosis de clomazone y donde no se aplicó fertilizante N inicial, mientras que en las parcelas que recibieron fertilizante N inicial no se vio ningún efecto de la dosis de clomazone sobre el rendimiento del arroz en granza. La dosis de clomazone no influenció el rendimiento del arroz en granza de Cocodrie en ninguno de los años, pero los rendimientos de arroz en granza de XL723 fueron más bajos en parcelas que recibieron clomazone cuando se compararon con parcelas que no recibieron clomazone en 1 de 3 años. Entonces, con base en la respuesta de la planta temprano durante la temporada de crecimiento y el rendimiento del arroz en granza, existe una susceptibilidad diferencial a clomazone entre Cocodrie y XL723. Los tratamientos con fertilizante N inicial fueron beneficiales para prevenir reducciones en el rendimiento producto del daño causado por clomazone.

Type
Weed Management-Major Crops
Copyright
© Weed Science Society of America, 2017 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor for this paper: Daniel Stephenson, Louisana State University Agricultural Center.

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