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Effects of Surfactants on the Herbicidal Activity of Several Herbicides in Aqueous Spray Systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2017

L. L. Jansen
Affiliation:
Crops Research Division, Agr. Res. Serv. U. S. Dept. of Agr., Beltsville, Maryland
W. A. Gentner
Affiliation:
Crops Research Division, Agr. Res. Serv. U. S. Dept. of Agr., Beltsville, Maryland
W. C. Shaw
Affiliation:
Crops Research Division, Agr. Res. Serv. U. S. Dept. of Agr., Beltsville, Maryland
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Extract

Formulation and preparation of herbicidal chemicals for the selective control of weeds in mechanized crop production have become increasingly more difficult with the introduction of a wide variety of organic and inorganic herbicides during recent years. Commercial herbicides and experimental chemicals are usually applied in systems which contain not only the active ingredients but also various solvents, cosolvents, surfactants (surface-active agents), carriers, and other adjuvants. Formulations of herbicides are usually evaluated for their maximum effects on weeds and minimum effects on crop plants. The manner in which the inactive constituents of formulations influence the ultimate herbicidal activity of the active ingredients is not well understood and extensive research will be required to obtain the fundamental information needed.

Type
Research Article
Information
Weeds , Volume 9 , Issue 3 , July 1961 , pp. 381 - 405
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 Weed Science Society of America 

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References

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