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Characterisation of the local Muscovy duck in Nigeria and its potential for egg and meat production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2013

A. YAKUBU*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Shabu-Lafia Campus, P.M.B. 135 Lafia, Nasarawa State, Nigeria
*
Corresponding author: abdul_mojeedy@yahoo.com
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Abstract

Research results and facts about indigenous Muscovy duck production in Nigeria are reviewed with the aim of assessing its current status and delivering relevant information to stakeholders and other potential beneficiaries. There are large variations in phenotypic and biochemical characteristics of indigenous Muscovy ducks in the country, which could serve as a basis for genetic improvement. These ducks have the potential for a mean live weight of 2.73 and 1.52 kg and dressing percentage of 71.2% and 69.8% for drakes and ducks, respectively. Under scavenging, backyard farming conditions, the ducks can lay between 60 and 80 eggs each per year, and about 100 and 125 eggs per bird per year with an egg weight of about 72g under improved management conditions. The morphological, meat and egg attributes of local Muscovy ducks may be exploited in management decisions geared towards ensuring an increase in productivity, thereby making an important contribution to food security in a developing economy.

Type
Small-scale Family Poultry Production
Copyright
Copyright © World's Poultry Science Association 2013 

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