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  • Print publication year: 2008
  • Online publication date: May 2012

20 - The Discourses of Practitioners in India

from PART VI - THE DISCOURSES OF PRACTITIONERS ON MEDICAL ETHICS
Summary
This chapter attempts to ensure group control of the new physicians beginning with their apprenticeship and the taking of oaths (Hinduism) or indirect regulation by the general observance of monastic rules including the required monthly confessions (Buddhism). The discourses of practitioners describe model nurses and model patients, and who should have access to medicine. After the arrival of Islam in India, this also served to keep Islamic medicine at bay. But with colonialism and the establishment of Western medicine, the discourses of practitioners reflect a deep conflict of values at the heart of medical practice, a conflict that has played out in independent India with the call for a return to a pure Hindu medicine as an expression of Indian nationalism. Traditional medicines and their underlying principles of holism and balance are spreading to the West.
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The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics
  • Online ISBN: 9781139195812
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521888790
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