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Ethnoprimatology
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  • Cited by 11
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Dore, Kerry M. 2018. Ethnoprimatology without Conservation: The Political Ecology of Farmer–Green Monkey (Chlorocebus sabaeus) Relations in St. Kitts, West Indies. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 918.

    Hanson, Katherine T. and Riley, Erin P. 2018. Beyond Neutrality: the Human–Primate Interface During the Habituation Process. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 852.

    McKinney, Tracie 2018. The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology. p. 1.

    Hofner, Alexandra N. Jost Robinson, Carolyn A. and Nekaris, K. A. I. 2018. Preserving Preuss’s Red Colobus (Piliocolobus preussi): an Ethnographic Analysis of Hunting, Conservation, and Changing Perceptions of Primates in Ikenge-Bakoko, Cameroon. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 895.

    Kaburu, Stefano S. K. Marty, Pascal R. Beisner, Brianne Balasubramaniam, Krishna N. Bliss-Moreau, Eliza Kaur, Kawaljit Mohan, Lalit and McCowan, Brenda 2018. Rates of human-macaque interactions affect grooming behavior among urban-dwelling rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta ). American Journal of Physical Anthropology,

    Ellwanger, Amanda L. and Lambert, Joanna E. 2018. Investigating Niche Construction in Dynamic Human-Animal Landscapes: Bridging Ecological and Evolutionary Timescales. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 797.

    Riley, Erin P. 2018. The Maturation of Ethnoprimatology: Theoretical and Methodological Pluralism. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 705.

    Ellwanger, Amanda L. 2018. The International Encyclopedia of Biological Anthropology. p. 1.

    McKinney, Tracie and Dore, Kerry M. 2018. The State of Ethnoprimatology: Its Use and Potential in Today’s Primate Research. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 730.

    Riley, Erin P. and Bezanson, Michelle 2018. Ethics of Primate Fieldwork: Toward an Ethically Engaged Primatology. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 47, Issue. 1, p. 493.

    Palmer, Alexandra and Malone, Nicholas 2018. Extending Ethnoprimatology: Human–Alloprimate Relationships in Managed Settings. International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 39, Issue. 5, p. 831.

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Book description

Ethnoprimatology, the combining of primatological and anthropological practice and the viewing of humans and other primates as living in integrated and shared ecological and social spaces, has become an increasingly popular approach to primate studies in the twenty-first century. Offering an insight into the investigation and documentation of human-nonhuman primate relations in the Anthropocene, this book guides the reader through the preparation, design, implementation, and analysis of an ethnoprimatological research project, offering practical examples of the vast array of methods and techniques at chapter level. With contributions from the world's leading experts in the field, Ethnoprimatology critically analyses current primate conservation efforts, outlines their major research questions, theoretical bases and methods, and tackles the challenges and complexities involved in mixed-methods research. Documenting the spectrum of current research in the field, it is an ideal volume for students and researchers in ethnoprimatology, primatology, anthropology, and conservation biology.

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