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Religious Experience and Lay Society in T'ang China
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  • Cited by 5
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Sun, Yinggang 2015. Imagined reality: Urban space and Sui-Tang beliefs in the underworld. Studies in Chinese Religions, Vol. 1, Issue. 4, p. 375.


    Copp, Paul 2012. The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Chinese Religions.


    Rawson, Jessica 2012. Inside out: creating the exotic within early Tang dynasty China in the seventh and eighth centuries. World Art, Vol. 2, Issue. 1, p. 25.


    Berg, Daria 2009. CULTURAL DISCOURSE ON XUE SUSU, A COURTESAN IN LATE MING CHINA. International Journal of Asian Studies, Vol. 6, Issue. 02, p. 171.


    1997. Western-Language Works on T'ang Studies, 1996-97. Tang Studies, Vol. 1997, Issue. 15-16, p. 221.


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    Religious Experience and Lay Society in T'ang China
    • Online ISBN: 9780511523823
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511523823
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Book description

The remains of Tai Fu's lost collection Kuang-i chi ('The Great Book of Marvels') preserve three hundred short tales of encounters with the other world. This study develops a style of close reading through which those tales give access to the lives of individuals in eighth-century China. Through the eyes of a mid-century county official the picture emerges of a complex lay society, served by a mixed priesthood of ritual practitioners, whose members' lives at all levels were profoundly shaped by their perceived experience of contact with the other world. It was a society embarking on fundamental change, and this book uses the sharp historical focus of Tai Fu's collection to study the dynamics of that change. The work gracefully reveals the transition from the beliefs and institutions of early mediaeval China towards those we now recognize as modern.

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