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Scientific Controversies
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  • Cited by 48
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Engelhardt, H. Tristram 1989. Foundations: Why they Provide so Little. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology, Vol. 20, Issue. 2, p. 170.

    Cothern, C. Richard 1989. Some Scientific Judgments in the Assessment of the Risk of Environmental Contaminants. Toxicology and Industrial Health, Vol. 5, Issue. 3, p. 479.

    ELZINGA, AANT 1989. Strategic Defense Initiative Research A Gray Area for Ethics. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 577, Issue. 1 Ethical Issue, p. 262.

    Clarke, Adele E. 1990. Controversy and the Development of Reproductive Sciences. Social Problems, Vol. 37, Issue. 1, p. 18.

    Scott, Pam Richards, Evelleen and Martin, Brian 1990. Captives of Controversy: The Myth of the Neutral Social Researcher in Contemporary Scientific Controversies. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 15, Issue. 4, p. 474.

    Roe, Emery M. 1992. Global warming as analytic tip. Critical Review, Vol. 6, Issue. 2-3, p. 411.

    Hård, Mikael 1993. Beyond Harmony and Consensus: A Social Conflict Approach to Technology. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 18, Issue. 4, p. 408.

    Epstein, Steven 1995. The Construction of Lay Expertise: AIDS Activism and the Forging of Credibility in the Reform of Clinical Trials. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 20, Issue. 4, p. 408.

    Johnston, Sean F. 1996. The Construction of Colorimetry by Committee. Science in Context, Vol. 9, Issue. 04,

    Gross, Alan G. 1998. Do Disputes over Priority Tell Us Anything about Science?. Science in Context, Vol. 11, Issue. 02, p. 161.

    Dascal, Marcelo 1998. The Study of Controversies and the Theory and History of Science. Science in Context, Vol. 11, Issue. 02, p. 147.

    Kerr, Anne Cunningham-Burley, Sarah and Amos, Amanda 1998. Eugenics and the New Genetics in Britain: Examining Contemporary Professionals' Accounts. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 23, Issue. 2, p. 175.

    Cremaschi, Sergio and Dascal, Marcelo 1998. Malthus and Ricardo: Two styles for Economic Theory. Science in Context, Vol. 11, Issue. 02, p. 229.

    Mitchell, Gordon R. 2000. Whose Shoe Fits Best? Dubious Physics and Power Politics in the TMD Footprint Controversy. Science, Technology, & Human Values, Vol. 25, Issue. 1, p. 52.

    Allen, Garland E. 2001. The biological basis of crime: An historical and methodological study. Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences, Vol. 31, Issue. 2, p. 183.

    Söderholm, Patrik 2003. Reflections on the oil depletion controversy. Minerals & Energy - Raw Materials Report, Vol. 18, Issue. 2, p. 2.

    Bengtsson, Magnus and Tillman, Anne-Marie 2004. Actors and interpretations in an environmental controversy: the Swedish debate on sewage sludge use in agriculture. Resources, Conservation and Recycling, Vol. 42, Issue. 1, p. 65.

    Martin, Brian 2004. Dissent and heresy in medicine: models, methods, and strategies. Social Science & Medicine, Vol. 58, Issue. 4, p. 713.

    Oreskes, Naomi 2004. Science and public policy: what’s proof got to do with it?. Environmental Science & Policy, Vol. 7, Issue. 5, p. 369.

    Horst, Maja 2005. Cloning sensations: mass mediated articulation of social responses to controversial biotechnology. Public Understanding of Science, Vol. 14, Issue. 2, p. 185.

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    Scientific Controversies
    • Online ISBN: 9780511628719
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511628719
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Book description

This collection of essays examines the ways in which disputes and controversies about the application of scientific knowledge are resolved. Four concrete examples of public controversy are considered in detail: the efficacy of Laetrile, the classification of homosexuality as a disease, the setting of safety standards in the workplace, and the utility of nuclear energy as a source of power. The essays in this volume show that debates about these cases are not confined to matters of empirical fact. Rather, as is seen with most scientific and technical controversies, they focus on and are structured by complex ethical, economic, and political interests. Drs. Engelhardt and Caplan have brought together a distinguished group of scholars from the sciences and humanities, who sketch a theory of scientific controversy and attempt to provide recommendations about the ways in which both scientists and the public ought to seek more informed resolutions of highly contentious issues in science and technology. Scientific Controversies is offered as a contribution to the better understanding of the roles of both science and nonscientific interests in disputes and controversies pertaining to science and technology.

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