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Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780–1840
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    Snell, K. D. M. 2003. The culture of local xenophobia. Social History, Vol. 28, Issue. 1, p. 1.

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    Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780–1840
    • Online ISBN: 9780511612299
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511612299
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Book description

This book, first published in 2000, examines the diversity of protest from 1780 to 1840 and how it altered during this period of extreme change. This textbook covers all forms of protest, including the Gordon Riots of 1780, food riots, Luddism, the radical political reform movement and Peterloo in 1819, and the less well researched anti-enclosure, anti-New Poor Law riots, arson and other forms of 'terroristic' action, up to the advent of Chartism in the 1830s. Archer evaluates the problematic nature of source materials and conflicting interpretations leading to debate, and reviews the historiography and methodology of protest studies. This study of popular protest gives a unique perspective on the social history and conditions of this crucial period and will provide a valuable resource for students and teachers alike.

Reviews

‘… excellent review of the current state of research into the phenomena of social unrest and popular protest in England in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries … this is a book to be highly recommended to students new to the field and also one which has much to say that will be of interest to those already familiar with it.’

Source: History

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