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  • Print publication year: 2014
  • Online publication date: June 2014

Section 7 - Disease-specific neurorehabilitation systems

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Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation
  • Online ISBN: 9780511995590
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511995590
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