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Lessons for regulating informal markets and implications for quality assurance – the case of migrant care workers in Austria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2015

ANDREA E. SCHMIDT*
Affiliation:
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna, Austria.
JULIANE WINKELMANN
Affiliation:
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna, Austria.
RICARDO RODRIGUES
Affiliation:
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna, Austria.
KAI LEICHSENRING
Affiliation:
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna, Austria.
*
Address for correspondence: Andrea E. Schmidt, European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Berggasse 17, A-1090 Vienna, Austria E-mail: schmidt@euro.centre.org

Abstract

The rising number of private care arrangements in which live-in migrant care workers are engaged as a functional equivalent to family care calls for special attention by policy makers and formal long-term care providers on their implications for quality assurance and professional standards in the long-term care sector. Austria is one of the first countries in Europe where tangible legal measures have been taken to regulate this area under the heading of ‘24-hour care’, typically provided by middle-aged women. Reform measures went beyond policing and control mechanisms, including also incentives and tangible subsidies for all stakeholders. This paper contributes to a better understanding of their impact on the transition from informal to formal economy, focusing on quality assurance and working conditions. Based on empirical data and findings from semi-structured interviews with relevant stakeholders, a framework for the analysis of ‘illegal markets', based on Beckert and Wehinger's theory, is used to discuss potential implications in terms of valuation, competition and co-operation for policy in Austria, and to draw lessons for other countries. Results indicate that even after efforts to ‘legalise’ migrant care, the sector remains a ‘grey’ area within modern labour market legislation and quality management. This is due to the very nature of personal care, low professional status associated with care work and the reluctance of political stakeholders to regulate private household activities.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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