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Inducements versus Constraints: Disaggregating “Corporatism”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2014

Ruth Berins Collier
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
David Collier
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley

Abstract

The concept of “corporatism” has usefully called attention to the importance of systems of interest representation based on non-competing groups that are officially sanctioned, subsidized, and supervised by the state. Yet these patterns have appeared in such a remarkable variety of political contexts that this concept may be too broad to be useful. On the basis of an analysis of the relationship between the state and organized labor in Latin America, this article argues that the concept of corporatism can be disaggregated so that it sheds light on rather than obscures the different power relationships and political contexts with which it is associated. The analysis focuses on the distinction between “inducements” extended by the state to win the cooperation of groups and “constraints” through which the state directly controls groups. This disaggregated approach enables one to distinguish more subtly among systems of group representation, to conceive of state-group relations in more interactive terms, and to gain insights into the larger political context.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 1979

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