Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Effect of replacing grass silage with maize silage in the diet on bovine milk fatty acid composition

  • K. E. Kliem (a1), R. Morgan (a1), D. J. Humphries (a1), K. J. Shingfield (a2) and D. I. Givens (a1)...
Abstract

Even though extensive research has examined the role of nutrition on milk fat composition, there is less information on the impact of forages on milk fatty acid (FA) composition. In the current study, the effect of replacing grass silage (GS) with maize silage (MS) as part of a total mixed ration on animal performance and milk FA composition was examined using eight multiparous mid-lactation cows in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square with 28-day experimental periods. Four treatments comprised the stepwise replacement of GS with MS (0, 160, 334 and 500 g/kg dry matter (DM)) in diets containing a 54 : 46 forage : concentrate ratio on a DM basis. Replacing GS with MS increased (P < 0.001) the DM intake, milk yield and milk protein content. Incremental replacement of GS with MS in the diet enhanced linearly (P < 0.001) the proportions of 6:0–14:0, decreased (P < 0.01) the 16:0 concentrations, but had no effect on the total milk fat saturated fatty acid content. Inclusion of MS altered the distribution of trans-18:1 isomers and enhanced (P < 0.05) total trans monounsaturated fatty acid and total conjugated linoleic acid content. Milk total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content decreased with higher amounts of MS in the diet and n-6 PUFA concentration increased, leading to an elevated n-6 : n-3 PUFA ratio. Despite some beneficial changes associated with the replacement of GS with MS, the overall effects on milk FA composition would not be expected to substantially improve long-term human health. However, the role of forages on milk fat composition must also be balanced against the increases in total milk and protein yield on diets containing higher proportions of MS.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effect of replacing grass silage with maize silage in the diet on bovine milk fatty acid composition
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effect of replacing grass silage with maize silage in the diet on bovine milk fatty acid composition
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effect of replacing grass silage with maize silage in the diet on bovine milk fatty acid composition
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
E-mail: k.e.kliem@reading.ac.uk
References
Hide All
Alderman G 1985. Prediction of the energy value of compound feeds. In Recent advances in animal nutrition (ed. W Haresign and DJA Cole), pp. 353. Butterworths, London.
Barber GD, Offer NW, Givens DI 1989. Predicting the nutritive value of silage. In Recent advances in animal nutrition – 1989 (ed. W Haresign and DJA Cole), pp. 141158. Butterworths, London.
Barber MC, Clegg RA, Travers MT, Vernon RG 1997. Lipid metabolism in the lactating mammary gland. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1347, 101126.
Blaxter KL 1962. The energy metabolism of ruminants. Charles C Thomas, Springfield, IL, US.
Brown VE, Rymer C, Agnew RE, Givens DI 2002. Relationship between in vitro gas production profiles of forages and in vivo rumen fermentation patterns in beef steers fed those forages. Animal Feed Science and Technology 98, 1324.
Calabrò S, Williams BA, Piccolo V, Infascelli F, Tamminga S 2004. A comparison between buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cow (Bos taurus) rumen fluids in terms of the in vitro fermentation characteristics of three fibrous feedstuffs. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 84, 645652.
Calabrò S, López S, Piccolo V, Dijkstra J, Dhanoa MS, France J 2005. Comparative analysis of gas production profiles obtained with buffalo and sheep ruminal fluid as the source of inoculum. Animal Feed Science and Technology 123/124, 5165.
Chilliard Y, Ferlay A, Doreau M 2001. Effect of different types of forages, animal fat or marine oils in cow’s diet on milk fat secretion and composition, especially conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Livestock Production Science 70, 3148.
Chilliard Y, Glasser F, Ferlay A, Bernard L, Rouel J, Doreau M 2007. Diet, rumen biohydrogenation and nutritional quality of cow and goat milk fat. European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology 109, 828855.
Christie WW 1982. A simple procedure for rapid transmethylation of glycerolipids and cholesteryl esters. Journal of Lipid Research 23, 10721075.
Collomb M, Seiber R, Bütikofer U 2004. CLA isomers in milk fat from cows fed diets with high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. Lipids 39, 355364.
Dewhurst RJ, Shingfield KJ, Lee MRF, Scollan ND 2006. Increasing the concentrations of beneficial polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk produced by dairy cows in high-forage systems. Animal Feed Science and Technology 131, 168206.
Enjalbert F, Nicot M-C, Bayourthe C, Moncoulon R 1998. Duodenal infusions of palmitic, stearic or oleic acids differently affect mammary gland metabolism of fatty acids in lactating dairy cows. Journal of Nutrition 128, 15251532.
Ferlay A, Martin B, Pradel P, Coulon JB, Chilliard Y 2006. Influence of grass-based diets on milk fatty acid composition and milk lipolytic system in Tarentaise and Montbeliarde cow breeds. Journal of Dairy Science 89, 40264041.
Fievez V, Vlaeminck B, Dhanoa MS, Dewhurst RJ 2003. Use of principle component analysis to investigate the origin of heptadecenoic and conjugated linoleic acids in milk. Journal of Dairy Science 86, 40474053.
Givens DI, Rulquin H 2004. Utilisation by ruminants of nitrogen compounds in silage-based diets. Animal Feed Science and Technology 114, 118.
Givens DI, Shingfield KJ 2006. Optimising dairy milk fatty acid composition. InImproving the fat content of foods (ed. C Williams and J Buttriss), pp. 252280. Woodhead Publishing, Cambridge, UK.
Givens DI, Cottyn BG, Dewey PJS, Steg A 1995. A comparison of the neutral detergent-cellulase method with other laboratory methods for predicting the digestibility in vivo of maize silages from three European countries. Animal Feed Science and Technology 54, 5564.
Givens DI, Cottrill BR, Davies M, Lee PA, Mansbridge RJ, Moss AR 2001. Sources of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids additional to fish oil for livestock diets – a review. Nutrition Abstracts and Reviews, Series B: Livestock Feeds and Feeding 71, 53R83R.
Harfoot CG, Hazlewood GP 1997. Lipid metabolism in the rumen. In The rumen microbial ecosystem, 2nd edition (ed. PN Hobson and CS Stewart), pp. 382426. Blackie Academic & Professional, London, UK.
Hulshof KFAM, van Erp-Baart MA, Anttolainen M, Becker W, Church SM, Couet C, Hermann-Kunz E, Kesteloot H, Leth T, Martins I, Moreiras O, Moschandreas J, Pizzoferato L, Rimestad AH, Thorgeirsdottir H, van Amelsvoort JMM, Aro A, Kafatos AG, Lanzmann-Petitory D, van Poppel G 1999. Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids: The TRANSFAIR study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53, 143157.
Jouany J-P, Lassalas B, Doreau M, Glasser F 2007. Dynamic features of the rumen metabolism of linoleic acid, linolenic acid and linseed oil measured in vitro. Lipids 42, 351360.
Kalscheur KF, Teter BB, Piperova LS, Erdman RA 1997. Effect of dietary forage concentration and buffer addition on duodenal flow of trans-C18:1 fatty acids and milk fat production in dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science 80, 21042114.
Kinsella JE 1972. Stearyl CoA as a precursor of oleic acid and glycerolipids in mammary microsomes from lactating bovine: possible regulatory step in milk triglyceride synthesis. Lipids 7, 349355.
Lock AL, Shingfield KJ 2004. Optimising milk composition. In Dairying – using science to meet consumers’ needs. British Society of Animal Science, publication no. 29 (ed. E Kebreab, J Mills and DE Beever), pp. 107188. Nottingham University Press, Nottingham, UK.
Loor JJ, Ueda K, Ferlay A, Chilliard Y, Doreau M 2005. Intestinal flow and digestibility of trans fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) in dairy cows fed a high-concentrate diet supplemented with fish oil, linseed oil or sunflower oil. Animal Feed Science and Technology 119, 203225.
Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food 1986. The analysis of agricultural materials. Reference book 427. Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, London, UK.
Mensink RP, Zock PL, Kester ADM, Katan MB 2003. Effects of dietary fatty acids and carbohydrates on the ratio of serum total to HDL cholesterol and on serum lipids and apolipoproteins:a meta-analysis of 60 controlled trials. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 77, 11461155.
Motard-Bélanger A, Charest A, Grenier G, Paquin P, Chouinard Y, Lemieux S, Couture P, Lamarche B 2008. Study of the effects of trans fatty acids from ruminants on blood lipids and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 87, 593599.
Nielsen TS, Straarup EM, Vestergaard M, Sejrsen K 2006. Effect of silage type and concentrate level on conjugated linoleic acids, trans-C18:1 isomers and fat content in milk from dairy cows. Reproduction, Nutrition, Development 46, 699712.
O’Mara FP, Fitzgerald JJ, Murphy JJ, Rath M 1998. The effect on milk production of replacing grass silage with maize silage in the diet of dairy cows. Livestock Production Science 55, 7987.
Phipps RH, Sutton JD, Jones BA 1995. Forage mixtures for dairy cows: the effect on dry-matter intake and milk production of incorporating either fermented or urea-treated whole-crop wheat, brewer’s grains, fodder beet or maize silage into diets based on grass silage. Animal Science 61, 491496.
Rigout S, Hurtaud C, Lemosquet S, Bach A, Rulquin H 2003. Lactational effects of propionic acid and duodenal glucose in cows. Journal of Dairy Science 86, 243253.
Roy A, Ferlay A, Shingfield KJ, Chilliard Y 2006. Examination of the persistency of milk fatty acid composition responses to plant oils in cows given different basal diets, with particular emphasis on trans-C18:1 fatty acids and isomers of conjugated linoleic acid. Animal Science 82, 479492.
SACN/COT 2004. Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) and Committee on Toxicity (COT), advise on fish consumption: benefits and risks. The Stationery Office (TSO), Norwich, UK.
Shingfield KJ, Ahvenjärvi S, Toivonen V, Ärölä A, Nurmela KVV, Huhtanen P, Griinari JM 2003. Effect of dietary fish oil on biohydrogenation of fatty acids and milk fatty acid content in cows. Animal Science 77, 165179.
Shingfield KJ, Reynolds CK, Lupoli B, Toivonen V, Yurawecz MP, Delmonte P, Griinari JM, Grandison AS, Beever DE 2005. Effect of forage type and proportion of concentrate in the diet on milk fatty acid composition in cows given sunflower oil and fish oil. Animal Science 80, 225238.
Shingfield KJ, Reynolds CK, Hervás G, Griinari JM, Grandison AS, Beever DE 2006. Examination of the persistency of milk fatty acid responses to fish oil and sunflower oil in the diet of dairy cows. Journal of Dairy Science 89, 714732.
Shingfield KJ, Chilliard Y, Toivonen V, Kairenius P, Givens DI 2008. Trans fatty acids and bioactive lipids in ruminant milk. In Bioactive components of milk, advances in experimental medicine and biology, vol. 606 (ed. Z Bösze), pp. 366. Springer, New York, NY.
Simopoulos AP 2002. The importance of the ratio of omega-6/omega-3 essential fatty acids. Biomedicine and Pharmacotherapy 56, 365379.
Souza PFA, Williamson DH 1993. Effects of feeding medium-chain triacylglycerols on maternal lipid metabolism and pup growth in lactating rats. British Journal of Nutrition 69, 779787.
Sukhija PS, Palmquist DL 1988. Rapid method for determination of total fatty acid content and composition of feedstuffs and feces. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 36, 12021206.
Sveinbjörnsson J, Murphy M, Udén P 2006. Effect of the proportions of neutral detergent fibre and starch, and their degradation rates, on in vitro ruminal fermentation. Animal Feed Science and Technology 130, 172190.
Vessby B, Uusitupa M, Hermansen K, Riccardi G, Rivallese AA, Tapsell LC, Nalsen C, Berglund L, Louheranta A, Rassmussen BM, Calvert GD, Maffetone A, Pederson E, Gustafsson I-B, Storlien LH 2001. Substituting dietary saturated for monounsaturated fat impairs insulin sensitivity in healthy men and women. Diabetologia 44, 312319.
Vlaeminck B, Fievez V, Cabrita ARJ, Fonseca AJM, Dewhurst RJ 2006. Factors affecting odd- and branched-chain fatty acids in milk: a review. Animal Feed Science and Technology 131, 389417.
WHO/FAO 2003. Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases. Report of a Joint WHO/FAO Expert Consultation. WHO, Geneva, CH.
Wilkinson JM, Wadephul F, Hill J 1996. Silages in Europe: a survey of 33 countries. Chalcombe Publications, Lincoln, UK.
Williams CM 2000. Dietary fatty acids and human health. Annales de Zootechnie 49, 165180.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

animal
  • ISSN: 1751-7311
  • EISSN: 1751-732X
  • URL: /core/journals/animal
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 3
Total number of PDF views: 106 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 132 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 22nd October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.