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The case for computational modelling of the Roman economy: a reply to Van Oyen

  • Tom Brughmans (a1) and Jeroen Poblome (a2)
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We thank Astrid Van Oyen for a highly constructive and important discussion piece that will improve our own future work, as well as that of others. We wish to elaborate on one issue: that formalist approaches do not necessarily have inherently modernist theoretical assumptions.

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Corresponding author
*Author for correspondence (Email: tom.brughmans@arch.ox.ac.uk)
References
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Arthur W.B. 1999. Complexity and the economy. Science 284: 107109. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.284.5411.107
Brughmans T. & Poblome J.. 2016a. MERCURY: an agent-based model of tableware trade in the Roman East. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation 19: https://doi.org/10.18564/jasss.2953
Brughmans T. & Poblome J.. 2016b. Roman bazaar or market economy? Explaining tableware distributions through computational modelling. Antiquity 350: 393408.
Epstein J.M. 1999. Agent-based computational models and generative social science. Complexity 4: 4160. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1099-0526(199905/06)4:5<41::AID-CPLX9>3.0.CO;2-F
Hamill L. & Gilbert N.. 2016. Agent-based modelling in economics. Chichester: Wiley.
Simon H.A. 1972. Theories of bounded rationality, in McGuire C. & Radner R. (ed.) Decision and organization: 161–76. Amsterdam: North-Holland.
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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
  • URL: /core/journals/antiquity
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