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Social networks and the spread of Lapita

  • Robin Torrence (a1) and Pamela Swadling (a2)
Extract

Lapita pottery seems to arrive in the Pacific out of the blue, and signal a new social, economic or ideological network. The authors show that widespread interaction, articulated by obsidian tools and stone mortars and pestles decorated with various motifs, was already in existence in New Guinea and New Britain. These earlier networks provide a preview of the social interaction that was to light up with the advent of Lapita.

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Antiquity
  • ISSN: 0003-598X
  • EISSN: 1745-1744
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