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A constructionist account of emotional disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 May 2012

Angélique O. J. Cramer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. angecramer@gmail.com/A.O.J.Cramer@uva.nlwww.aojcramer.comdennyborsboom@gmail.comhttp://sites.google.com/site/borsboomdenny/dennyborsboom
Kenneth S. Kendler
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Genetics, Richmond, VA 23298-0126. kendler@vcu.edu
Denny Borsboom
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WB Amsterdam, The Netherlands. angecramer@gmail.com/A.O.J.Cramer@uva.nlwww.aojcramer.comdennyborsboom@gmail.comhttp://sites.google.com/site/borsboomdenny/dennyborsboom

Abstract

Lindquist et al. present a strong case for a constructionist account of emotion. First, we elaborate on the ramifications that a constructionist account of emotions might have for psychiatric disorders with emotional disturbances as core elements. Second, we reflect on similarities between Lindquist et al.'s model and recent attempts at formulating psychiatric disorders as networks of causally related symptoms.

Type
Open Peer Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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