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Non-instrumental belief is largely founded on singularity1

  • George Ainslie (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

The radical evolutionary step that divides human decision-making from that of nonhumans is the ability to excite the reward process for its own sake, in imagination. Combined with hyperbolic over-valuation of the present, this ability is a potential threat to both the individual's long term survival and the natural selection of high intelligence. Human belief is intrinsically “unfounded” or under-founded, which may or may not be adaptive.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

G. Ainslie (2005) Précis of Breakdown of will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28(5):635–73.

G. Ainslie (2010) Procrastination, the basic impulse. In: The thief of time: Philosophical essays on procrastination, ed. C. Andreou & M. White . pp. 1127. Oxford University Press.

J. Gibbon (1977) Scalar expectancy theory and Weber's law in animal timing. Psychological Review 84:279325.

L. Green & J. Myerson (2004) A discounting framework for choice with delayed and probabilistic rewards. Psychological Bulletin 130:769–92.

K. N. Kirby (1997) Bidding on the future: Evidence against normative discounting of delayed rewards. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 126:5470.

S. E. G. Lea & P. Webley (2006) Money as tool, money as drug: The biological psychology of a strong incentive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29:161209.

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences
  • ISSN: 0140-525X
  • EISSN: 1469-1825
  • URL: /core/journals/behavioral-and-brain-sciences
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