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Behavioural Insights Team: ethical, professional and historical considerations

  • LIAM DELANEY
Abstract

The Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) has led in the promotion and adoption of behavioural science research in public policy. This comment addresses a number of issues that must be faced by BIT and the wider behavioural public policy agenda as the field becomes institutionalised and normalised within public policy internationally, in particular issues of ethics and professional codes.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Correspondence to: University College Dublin, Geary Institute and School of Economics, Dublin, Ireland. Email: liam.delaney@ucd.ie
References
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Behavioural Public Policy
  • ISSN: 2398-063X
  • EISSN: 2398-0648
  • URL: /core/journals/behavioural-public-policy
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