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  • ISSN: 2398-063X (Print), 2398-0648 (Online)
Behavioural Public Policy is an interdisciplinary and international peer-reviewed journal devoted to behavioural research and its relevance to public policy. The study of human behaviour is important within many disciplinary specialties and in recent years the findings from this field have begun to be applied to policy concerns in a substantive and sustained way. BPP seeks to be multidisciplinary and therefore welcomes articles from economists, psychologists, philosophers, anthropologists, sociologists, political scientists, primatologists, evolutionary biologists, legal scholars and others, so long as their work relates the study of human behaviour directly to a policy concern. BPP focuses on high-quality research which has international relevance and which is framed such that the arguments are accessible to a multidisciplinary audience of academics and policy makers.

The 1st Annual International Behavioural Public Policy Conference 2020

10th -11th September 2020, LSE

Hosted by the Department of Social Policy and supported by the Marshall Institute and STICERD.

This new annual conference, the first of its type, aims to fill a gap by providing a forum for those interested in the link between behavioural science and public policy to discuss their work.

Discover more

BPP Blog

  • Heterogeneity in helminth infections: factors influencing aggregation in a simple host-parasite system
  • 12 December 2019, R C Tinsley
  • The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Heterogeneity in helminth infections: factors influencing aggregation in a simple host–parasite system Parasitic worms are rarely distributed randomly or uniformly in populations of their hosts.  Typically, parasites are unequally distributed with a majority of hosts infected by few or no parasites while a minority carry many parasites.  This heterogeneity has wide-ranging implications: for instance, the small proportion of heavy infections are responsible for the major share of total parasite reproduction and these hosts suffer greatest pathology.  By contrast, the majority of hosts with low worm burdens make little contribution to transmission and experience little harm.  Thus, control strategies to reduce disease in human and animal populations are most effective when directed selectively at the subset of high worm burdens.…...
  • Let’s go swimming: mermithid-infected earwigs exhibit positive hydrotaxis
  • 02 December 2019, Ryan Herbison
  • The latest Paper of the Month for Parasitology is Let’s go swimming: mermithid-infected earwigs exhibit positive hydrotaxis The term ‘back seat driver’ is used colloquially to describe a passenger in a car who is dissatisfied with the driver’s actions and therefore tries to control or influence them.…...


Video: Behavioural science and policy: where are we now and where are we going?