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Combining behavioral economics and field experiments to reimagine early childhood education

  • JOHN A. LIST (a1), ANYA SAMEK (a2) and DANA L. SUSKIND (a3)
Abstract

Behavioral economics and field experiments within the social sciences have advanced well beyond academic curiosum. Governments around the globe as well as the most powerful firms in modern economies employ staffs of behavioralists and experimentalists to advance and test best practices. In this study, we combine behavioral economics with field experiments to reimagine a new model of early childhood education. Our approach has three distinct features. First, by focusing public policy dollars on prevention rather than remediation, we call for much earlier educational programs than currently conceived. Second, our approach has parents at the center of the education production function rather than at its periphery. Third, we advocate attacking the macro education problem using a public health methodology, rather than focusing on piecemeal advances.

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Corresponding author
*Correspondence to: Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Chicago Medicine, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 1035, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Email: dsuskind@surgery.bsd.uchicago.edu
References
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Behavioural Public Policy
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