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Controversy over exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: Key lessons for clinicians and academics: Commentary on… Cochrane Corner

  • Alex J. Mitchell
Summary

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is syndrome of unremitting fatigue of at least 6 months' duration that causes significant disability. Exercise therapy has a proven track record in medicine and could be effective for some patients with CFS. An updated Cochrane review of eight studies appeared to suggest that exercise helps fatigue symptoms, but with only a small probability of recovery and/or improvement in daily function. Provisional data on acceptability suggest that most patients are willing to participate. However, one key study (PACE), which was well powered and influential in the Cochrane review, has been met with considerable controversy owing to lack of clarity on outcomes. Following release of the PACE study primary data, re-analysis suggested smaller effect sizes than initially reported.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence Dr Alex J. Mitchell, Department of Psycho-Oncology, Hadley House, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester LE5 4PW, UK. Email ajm80@le.ac.uk
Footnotes
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See p. 144, this issue.

Declaration of Interest

None

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 2056-4678
  • EISSN: 2056-4686
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Controversy over exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: Key lessons for clinicians and academics: Commentary on… Cochrane Corner

  • Alex J. Mitchell
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