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The application of Rasch measurement theory to psychiatric clinical outcomes research: Commentary on … Screening for depression in primary care

  • Skye P. Barbic (a1) and Stefan J. Cano (a2)
Summary

This commentary argues the importance of robust, meaningful assessment of clinical and functional outcomes in psychiatry. Outcome assessments should be fit for the purpose of measuring relevant concepts of interest in specific clinical settings. As well, the measurement model selected to develop and test assessments can be critical for guiding care. Three types of measurement models are presented: classical test theory, item response theory, and Rasch measurement theory. To optimise current diagnostic and treatment practices in psychiatry, careful consideration of these models is warranted.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Stefan Cano (stefan.cano@modusoutcomes.com)
Footnotes
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See original paper, pp. 237–243, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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1 US Food and Drug Administration. Clinical Outcome Assessment Qualification Program. FDA, 2015. Available at: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DrugDevelopmentToolsQualificationProgram/ucm284077.htm (accessed 23 November 2015).
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11 Horton, M, Perry, A. Screening for depression in primary care: a Rasch analysis of the PHQ-9? BJPsych Bull 2016; doi: 10.1192/pb.bp.114.050294.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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The application of Rasch measurement theory to psychiatric clinical outcomes research: Commentary on … Screening for depression in primary care

  • Skye P. Barbic (a1) and Stefan J. Cano (a2)
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