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Ending political abuse of psychiatry: where we are at and what needs to be done

  • Robert van Voren (a1)
Summary

The number of reports of political activists falling victim to the political abuse of psychiatry is increasing. When the USSR first disintegrated, this practice virtually ceased to occur. What came in its place, however, was a disturbing collection of other forms of abuses, including human rights abuses, caused by a lack of resources, outdated treatment methods, a lack of understanding of individual human rights and a growing lack of tolerance in society. The number of cases of political abuse of psychiatry has increased since the 21st century began, particularly over the past few years in Russia, Belarus and Kazakhstan.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Robert van Voren (rvvoren@gip-global.org)
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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1 Van Voren, R. Psychiatry as a Tool for Coercion in Post-Soviet Countries. European Union, 2013.
2 Munro, R. China's Psychiatric Inquisition. Wildy, Simmonds & Hill, 2006.
3 Knapp, M. Mental Health Policy and Practice Across Europe: The Future Direction of Mental Health Care. McGraw-Hill, 2007.
4 Gluzman, SF. On Soviet Totalitarian Psychiatry. International Association on the Political Use of Psychiatry, 1989.
5 Van Voren, R. Cold War in Psychiatry. Rodopi, 2010.
6 Bloch, S, Reddaway, P. Russia's Political Hospitals. Gollancz, 1977.
7 Bloch, S, Reddaway, P. Soviet Psychiatric Abuse – The Shadow over World Psychiatry. Gollancz, 1984.
8 Süss, S. Politisch Missbraucht [Politically Abused]? Ch Links, 1998.
9 Brown, CA, Lago, A. The Politics of Psychiatry in Revolutionary Cuba. Transaction Publishers, 1991.
10 Nijeboer, A. Een Man Tegen de Staat [A Man Against the State]. Papieren Tijger, 2006.
11 Human Rights Watch. Russia: Withdraw Charges Against Protester. Human Rights Watch (http://www.hrw.org/news/2014/03/26/russiawithdraw-charges-against-protester).
12 World Health Organization. The ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders: Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines. WHO, 1992.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Ending political abuse of psychiatry: where we are at and what needs to be done

  • Robert van Voren (a1)
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