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Development and clinimetric assessment of a nurse-administered screening tool for movement disorders in psychosis

  • Bettina Balint (a1), Helen Killaspy (a2), Louise Marston (a3), Thomas Barnes (a4), Anna Latorre (a5), Eileen Joyce (a6), Caroline S. Clarke (a7), Rosa De Micco (a8), Mark J. Edwards (a9), Roberto Erro (a10), Thomas Foltynie (a11), Rachael M. Hunter (a12), Fiona Nolan (a13), Anette Schrag (a14), Nick Freemantle (a15), Yvonne Foreshaw (a16), Nicholas Green (a16), Kailash P. Bhatia (a11) and Davide Martino (a17)...
Abstract
Background

Movement disorders associated with exposure to antipsychotic drugs are common and stigmatising but underdiagnosed.

Aims

To develop and evaluate a new clinical procedure, the ScanMove instrument, for the screening of antipsychotic-associated movement disorders for use by mental health nurses.

Method

Item selection and content validity assessment for the ScanMove instrument were conducted by a panel of neurologists, psychiatrists and a mental health nurse, who operationalised a 31-item screening procedure. Interrater reliability was measured on ratings for 30 patients with psychosis from ten mental health nurses evaluating video recordings of the procedure. Criterion and concurrent validity were tested comparing the ScanMove instrument-based rating of 13 mental health nurses for 635 community patients from mental health services with diagnostic judgement of a movement disorder neurologist based on the ScanMove instrument and a reference procedure comprising a selection of commonly used rating scales.

Results

Interreliability analysis showed no systematic difference between raters in their prediction of any antipsychotic-associated movement disorders category. On criterion validity testing, the ScanMove instrument showed good sensitivity for parkinsonism (90%) and hyperkinesia (89%), but not for akathisia (38%), whereas specificity was low for parkinsonism and hyperkinesia, and moderate for akathisia.

Conclusions

The ScanMove instrument demonstrated good feasibility and interrater reliability, and acceptable sensitivity as a mental health nurse-administered screening tool for parkinsonism and hyperkinesia.

Declaration of interest

None.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Kailash Bhatia, Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, 33 Queen Square, WC1N 3BG London, UK. Email: k.bhatia@ucl.ac.uk
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Development and clinimetric assessment of a nurse-administered screening tool for movement disorders in psychosis

  • Bettina Balint (a1), Helen Killaspy (a2), Louise Marston (a3), Thomas Barnes (a4), Anna Latorre (a5), Eileen Joyce (a6), Caroline S. Clarke (a7), Rosa De Micco (a8), Mark J. Edwards (a9), Roberto Erro (a10), Thomas Foltynie (a11), Rachael M. Hunter (a12), Fiona Nolan (a13), Anette Schrag (a14), Nick Freemantle (a15), Yvonne Foreshaw (a16), Nicholas Green (a16), Kailash P. Bhatia (a11) and Davide Martino (a17)...
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