Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-m7vrx Total loading time: 0.375 Render date: 2022-12-09T23:46:10.860Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Group music composing strategies: A case study within a rock band

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 September 2012

Michele Biasutti*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology, University of Padova, Via Beato Pellegrino, 28 – 35137 Padova, Italymichele.biasutti@unipd.it

Abstract

This paper reports on the compositional processes of an Italian rock band whilst composing a new piece over seven group composing sessions. The band members were videotaped during the group composing sessions in their rehearsal room. A qualitative analysis of the video recordings was performed using the Constant Comparative Method. In the analysis, 59 different behaviours emerged, which were subsequently reduced into 13 categories. When analysing the categories, five themes (activities) were defined. The five activities were: context definition, experimenting, constructing, playing and evaluating. The activities were employed as a coding technique for time coding the videotaped data, which revealed the time percentages spent by the musicians in each of the group composing activities. Results from the joint qualitative and percentage time analysis indicate the importance of the strategies adopted by the musicians during group composing. The results are discussed by taking into account the impact of the processes employed in a group composing setting as well as suggestions for future research. The implication for music education involves the possibility to apply approaches based on the development of cognitive processes rather than the product of collaborative composing activities.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

ADLER, S. (2010) My Appetite for Destruction: Sex, Drugs, and Guns N’ Roses. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
BIASUTTI, M. (2003) Psicopedagogia della musica. Padova: CLEUP.Google Scholar
BIASUTTI, M. (2011) Student experience of a collaborative e-learning university module. Computers and Education, 57, 18651875.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BIASUTTI, M. & FREZZA, L. (2009) The dimensions of music improvisation. Creativity Research Journal, 21, 232242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BOZZA, A. (2007) Slash. London: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
BRUFORD, B. (2009) Bill Bruford: The Autobiography: Yes, King Crimson, Earthworks, and more. London: Jawbone Press.Google Scholar
BURNARD, P. (2000 a) Examining experiential differences between improvisation and composition in children's music-making. British Journal of Music Education, 17, 227245.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BURNARD, P. (2000 b) How children ascribe meaning to improvisation and composition. Music Education Research, 2, 723.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BURNARD, P. (2002) Investigating the emergence of musical interaction in group improvisation. British Journal of Music Education, 19, 157172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BURNARD, P. & YOUNKER, B. A. (2002) Mapping pathways: Fostering creativity in composition. Music Education Research, 4, 245261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BURNARD, P. & YOUNKER, B. A. (2008) Investigating children's musical interactions within the activities systems of group composing and arranging: An application of Engeström's Activity Theory. International Journal of Educational Research, 47, 6074.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
CAMPBELL, P. S. (1995) Of garage bands and song-getting: The musical development of young rock musicians. Research Studies in Music Education, 4, 1220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
CHARMAZ, K. & HENWOOD, K. (2008) Grounded theory. In Willig, C. & Stainton Rogers, W. (Eds), The Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research in Psychology (pp. 240259). Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
COLLINS, D. (2005) A synthesis process model of creative thinking in music composition. Psychology of Music, 33, 193216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DENSMORE, J. (1991) Riders on the Storm: My Life with Jim Morrison and The Doors. New York: Delta Trade Paperbacks.Google Scholar
DILLON, T. (2003) Collaborating and creating on music technologies. International Journal of Educational Research, 39, 893897.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
FAUTLEY, M. (2004) Teacher intervention strategies in the composing processes of lower secondary school students. International Journal of Music Education, 22, 201218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
FOLKESTAD, G., HARGREAVES, D. & LINDSTROM, B. (1998) Compositional strategies in computer-based music-making. British Journal of Music Education, 15, 8397.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
FORNAS, J., LINDBERG, U. & SERNHEDE, O. (1995) In Garageland. Rock, Youth and Modernity. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
GALL, M. & BREEZE, N. (2005) Music composition lessons: the multimodal affordances of technology. Educational Review, 57, 415433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
GALL, M. & BREEZE, N. (2008) Music and eJay: an opportunity for creative collaborations in the classroom. International Journal of Educational Research, 47, 2740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
GLASER, B. G. & STRAUSS, A. L. (1967) The Discovery of Grounded Theory. Chicago: Aldine.Google Scholar
GREEN, L. (2002) How Popular Musicians Learn: A Way Ahead for Music Education. Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
GREEN, L. (2008) Music, Informal Learning and the School: A New Classroom Pedagogy. Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
HANSON, M. (2010) Playing the Band: The Musical Life of Jon Hiseman. London: Temple Music Books.Google Scholar
HENNESSY, S. (2007) Creativity in the music curriculum. In Wilson, A. C. (Ed.), Creativity in Primary Education. 2nd edition (pp. 134147). Exeter: Learning Matters Ltd.Google Scholar
HEWITT, A. (2002) A comparative analysis of process and product with specialist and generalist pre-service teachers involved in a group composition activity. Music Education Research, 4, 2536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
HEWITT, A. (2008) Children's creative collaboration during a computer-based music task. International Journal of Educational Research, 47, 1126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
JAFFURS, S. E. (2004) The impact of informal learning practices in the classroom, or how I learned to teach from a garage band. International Journal of Music Education, 22, 189200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
JOHANSSON, K. G. (2004) What chord was that? A study of strategies among ear players in rock music. Research Studies in Music Education, 23, 94101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KASCHUB, M. (1997) A comparison of two composer-guided large group composition projects. Research Studies in Music Education, 8, 1528.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KENNEDY, M. A. (1999) Where does the music come from? A comparison case-study of the compositional processes of a high-school and collegiate composer. British Journal of Music Education, 16, 152177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KENNEDY, M. A. (2002) Listening to the music: compositional processes of high school composers. Journal of Research in Music Education, 50, 94110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KRAMER, J. (2009) Hit Hard: A Story of Hitting Rock Bottom at the Top. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
KRATUS, J. (1989) A time analysis of the compositional processes used by children aged 7–12. Journal of Research in Music Education, 37, 520.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KRATUS, J. (1994) Relationships among children's music audiation and their compositional processes and products. Journal of Research in Music Education, 42, 115130.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
KRATUS, J. (2001) Effect of available tonality and pitch options on children's compositional processes and products. Journal of Research in Music Education, 49, 294313.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MACDONALD, R. & MIELL, D. (2000) Musical conversations: Collaborating with a friend on creative tasks. In Joiner, R., Littleton, K., Faulkner, D. & Miell, D. (Eds), Rethinking Collaborative Learning (pp. 6578). London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
MARSH, K. (1995) Children's singing games: composition in the playground? Research Studies in Music Education, 4, 211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MIELL, D. & LITTLETON, K. (Eds) (2004) Collaborative Creativity: Contemporary Perspectives. London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
MORGAN, L., HARGREAVES, D. & JOINER, R. (1997) How do children make music? Composition in small groups. Early Childhood Connections, 4, 1521.Google Scholar
PAYNTER, J. (2000) Making progress with composing. British Journal of Music Education, 17, 531.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
PRIEST, T. (2001) Using creativity assessment experience to nurture and predict compositional creativity. Journal of Research in Music Education, 49, 245258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SAWYER, R. K. (2003) Group Creativity. Music, Theater, Collaboration. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
SEDDON, F.A. & BIASUTTI, M. (2008) Non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers’ confidence in teaching music in the classroom. Music Education Research, 10, 403421.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SEDDON, F. A. & BIASUTTI, M. (2009 a) A comparison of modes of communication between members of a string quartet and a jazz sextet. Psychology of Music, 37, 395415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SEDDON, F. A. & BIASUTTI, M (2009 b) Modes of communication between members of a string quartet. Small Group Research, 40, 115137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SEDDON, F. A. & BIASUTTI, M. (2009 c) Evaluating a music e-learning resource: the participants’ perspective. Computers and Education, 53, 541549.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
SLOBODA, J. A. (1985) The Musical Mind. The Cognitive Psychology of Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
SMITH, J. (2008) Compositions of elementary recorder students created under various conditions of task structure. Research Studies in Music Education, 30, 159176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
STRAUSS, A. & CORBIN, J. (1998) Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques. 2nd edition.Thousand Oaks: Sage.Google Scholar
THORPE, V. E. (2008) We made this song. The group song writing processes of three adolescent rock bands. Unpublished Masters thesis, New Zealand School of Music, Wellington.Google Scholar
WALLAS, G. (1926) The Art of Thought. New York: Harcourt Brace.Google Scholar
WEBSTER, P. R. (1992) Research on creative thinking in music: the assessment literature. In Colwell, R. (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Music Teaching and Learning (pp. 266280). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
WEBSTER, P. R. (2002) Creative thinking in music: advancing a model. In Sullivan, T. & Willingham, L. (Eds), Creativity and Music Education (pp. 1633). Edmonton: Canadian Music Educator's Association.Google Scholar
WEBSTER, P. R. (2003) Asking music students to reflect on their creative work: Encouraging the revision process. Music Education Research, 5, 243248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
WESTERLUND, H. (2006) Garage Rock Bands: A future model for developing musical expertise? International Journal of Music Education, 24, 119125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
WIGGINS, J. (2001) Teaching for Musical Understanding. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
21
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Group music composing strategies: A case study within a rock band
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Group music composing strategies: A case study within a rock band
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Group music composing strategies: A case study within a rock band
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *