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Theory, technology and the music curriculum

  • Tim Cain (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0265051704005650
  • Published online: 01 July 2004
Abstract

In this short article I present a case for developing a new theory of music education, arguing that advances in music technology have undermined some of the most basic conceptual frameworks we currently possess. I describe some problems that might make the development of a new theory difficult and suggest some ways in which they might be overcome. My hope is that this paper will inspire people to consider the development of such a theory.

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British Journal of Music Education
  • ISSN: 0265-0517
  • EISSN: 1469-2104
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-music-education
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