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The assessment of the amount of fat in the human body from measurements of skinfold thickness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J. V. G. A. Durnin
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, The University, Glasgow, W 2
M. M. Rahaman
Affiliation:
Institute of Physiology, The University, Glasgow, W 2
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Abstract

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1. Skinfold thickness and body density were measured on 105 young adult men and women and 86 adolescent boys and girls.

2. The correlation coefficients between the skinfold thicknesses, either single or multiple, and density were in the region of −0.80.

3. Regression equations were calculated to predict body fat from skinfolds with an error of about ±3.5%.

4. A table gives the percentage of the body-weight as fat from the measurement of skin-fold thickness.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1967

References

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