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Association of fatty acids in serum phospholipids with hay fever, specific and total immunoglobulin E

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2007

Iris Kompauer
Affiliation:
GSF – National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany
Hans Demmelmair
Affiliation:
Dr von Haunersches Kinderspital, Division of Metabolic Disorders and Nutrition, Munich, Germany
Berthold Koletzko
Affiliation:
Dr von Haunersches Kinderspital, Division of Metabolic Disorders and Nutrition, Munich, Germany
Gabriele Bolte
Affiliation:
Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority, Department of Environmental Health, Oberschleissheim, Germany
Jakob Linseisen
Affiliation:
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, TU, Munich, Germany Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, Germany
Joachim Heinrich*
Affiliation:
GSF – National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Epidemiology, Neuherberg, Germany
*
*Corresponding author: Dr Joachim Heinrich, fax +49 89 3187 3380, email joachim.heinrich@gsf.de
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Abstract

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The dietary intake of certain fatty acids might contribute to the development of allergic diseases such as hay fever and asthma. We investigated the association between the concentrations of fifteen fatty acids in serum phospholipids, as a marker of dietary intake and metabolism, and hay fever, allergic sensitisation and total IgE in adults. Data from a population-based cross-sectional study on respiratory health, including the measurement of fatty acids in the serum phospholipids of 740 adults between 20 and 64 years of age, were analysed. Positive associations were found between hay fever and arachidonic acid, and allergic sensitisation and oleic acid. No other fatty acids showed any association with hay fever or allergic sensitisation. Elevated levels of total IgE were not related to fatty acids. Concentrations of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, trans fatty acids or saturated fatty acids in serum phospholipids were not associated with allergic diseases in adults in this study. The present result on the association between hay fever and arachidonic acid is consistent with current hypotheses but warrants further research.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2005

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