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Commentary to accompany the paper entitled ‘Nutritional disturbance in acid–base balance and osteoporosis: a hypothesis that disregards the essential homeostatic role of the kidney’, by Jean-Philippe Bonjour

  • Lynda A. Frassetto (a1) and Anthony Sebastian (a1)
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      Commentary to accompany the paper entitled ‘Nutritional disturbance in acid–base balance and osteoporosis: a hypothesis that disregards the essential homeostatic role of the kidney’, by Jean-Philippe Bonjour
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1Bonjour J-P (2013) Nutritional disturbance in acid–base balance and osteoporosis: an hypothesis that disregards the essential homeostatic role of the kidney. Br J Nutr 110, 11681177.
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12Oh MS (1991) Irrelevance of bone buffering to acid–base homeostasis in chronic metabolic acidosis. Nephron 59, 710.
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16Frassetto LA, Hardcastle AC, Sebastian A, et al. (2012) No evidence that the skeletal non-response to potassium alkali supplements in healthy postmenopausal women depends on blood pressure or sodium chloride intake. Eur J Clin Nutr 66, 13151322.
17Fenton TR, Lyon AW, Eliasziw M, et al. (2009) Meta-analysis of the effect of the acid-ash hypothesis of osteoporosis on calcium balance. J Bone Miner Res 24, 18351840.
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19Mardon J, Habauzit V, Trzeciakiewicz A, et al. (2008) Long-term intake of a high-protein diet with or without potassium citrate modulates acid–base metabolism, but not bone status, in male rats. J Nutr 138, 718724.
20Kurtz I, Maher T, Hulter HN, et al. (1983) Effect of diet on plasma acid–base composition in normal humans. Kidney Int 24, 670680.
21Frassetto LA, Morris RC Jr & Sebastian A (2007) Dietary sodium chloride intake independently predicts the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in healthy humans consuming a net acid-producing diet. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 293, F521F525.
22Lemann J Jr (1999) Relationship between urinary calcium and net acid excretion as determined by dietary protein and potassium: a review. Nephron 81, Suppl. 1, 1825.
23NIH Consensus Development Panel on Osteoporosis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Therapy (2001) Osteoporosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. JAMA 285, 785795.
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25Wesson DE, Simoni J, Broglio K, et al. (2011) Acid retention accompanies reduced GFR in humans and increases plasma levels of endothelin and aldosterone. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 300, F830F837.
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27Mitch WE, Medina R, Grieber S, et al. (1994) Metabolic acidosis stimulates muscle protein degradation by activating the adenosine triphosphate-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and proteasomes. J Clin Invest 93, 21272133.
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29Sebastian A, Frassetto LA, Merriam RL, et al. (2005) An evolutionary perspective on the acid–base effects of diet. In Acid–Base Disorders and Their Treatment, pp. 241292 [Gennari FJ, Adrogue HJ, Galla JH and Madias NE, editors]. Boca Raton, FL: Taylor and Francis Group.
30Lennon EJ, Lemann J Jr & Litzow JR (1996) The effect of diet and stool composition on the net external acid balance of normal subjects. J Clin Invest 45, 16011607.
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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