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Comparison of methods to estimate non-milk extrinsic sugars and their application to sugars in the diet of young adolescents

  • Sarah A. M. Kelly (a1), Carolyn Summerbell (a2), Andrew J. Rugg-Gunn (a1), Ashley Adamson (a3), Emma Fletcher (a3) and Paula J. Moynihan (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1079/BJN20051448
  • Published online: 08 March 2007
Abstract

Consistent information on the non-milk extrinsic sugars (NMES) content of foods and the NMES intake by the population is required in order to allow comparisons between dietary surveys. A critical appraisal of methods of NMES estimation was conducted to investigate whether the different published methods for estimating the NMES content of foods lead to significantly different values for the dietary intake of NMES by children and to consider the relative practicality of each method. NMES values of foods were calculated using three different published descriptions of methods of NMES estimation, and the values were compared within food groups. Dietary intake values for English children aged 11–12 years were calculated using each method and compared in terms of overall NMES intake and the contribution of different food groups to NMES intake. There was no significant difference in the dietary intake of NMES in children between the method used in the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) (81·9 g/d; 95 % CI 79·0, 84·7) and a method developed by the Human Nutrition Research Centre (84·3 g/d; 95 % CI 81·4, 87·2) at Newcastle University, UK, although the latter gave slightly higher values. An earlier method used by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries gave significantly higher values than the other two methods (102·5 g/d; 95 % CI 99·3, 105·6; P<0·05). The method used in the NDNS surveys and the method used by the Human Nutrition Research Centre at Newcastle University are both thorough and detailed methods that give consistent results. However, the method used in the NDNS surveys was more straightforward to apply in practice and is the best method for a single uniform approach to the estimation of NMES.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Paula Moynihan, fax +44 (0) 191 222 5928, email p.j.moynihan@ncl.ac.uk
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IT Johnson , DAT Southgate & JVGA Surnin (1996) Intrinsic and non-milk extrinsic sugars: does the distinction have analytical or physiological validity? Int J Food Sci Nutr 47, 131140.

SAM Kelly , PJ Moynihan , AJ Rugg-Gunn & CS Summerbell (2003) Review of methods used to estimate non-milk extrinsic sugars. J Hum Nutr Diet 16, 2738.

DS Ludwig , KE Peterson & SL Gortmaker (2001) Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: a prospective observational analysis. Lancet 357, 505508.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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