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Cross-sectional study to investigate the association between vitamin D status and cutaneous mast cell tumours in Labrador retrievers

  • Joseph J. Wakshlag (a1), Kenneth M. Rassnick (a1), Erin K. Malone (a1), Angela M. Struble (a1), Priyanka Vachhani (a1), Donald L. Trump (a2) and Lili Tian (a3)...
Abstract

Epidemiological data indicate that low serum vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of a variety of human tumours. Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCT) occur more frequently in dogs than in any other species. Canine MCT express the vitamin D receptor, and vitamin D derivatives have in vitro and in vivo anti-tumour activity. We sought to examine the association between vitamin D serum level and MCT in Labrador retrievers, a dog breed predisposed to MCT development. To examine this association, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentrations were examined in eighty-seven Labrador retrievers, including thirty-three with MCT and fifty-four unaffected controls. The relationship between cases and controls and 25(OH)D3 level, age and body condition score were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. Potential differences in vitamin D oral intake, calculated on the basis of a dietary questionnaire, were also evaluated between groups. Mean 25(OH)D3 concentration (104 (sd 30) nmol/l) in dogs with MCT was significantly lower than that of unaffected dogs (120 (sd 35) nmol/l; P = 0·027). The mean calculated vitamin D intake per kg body weight in Labrador retrievers with MCT was not statistically different from that of unaffected Labrador retrievers (0·38 (sd 0·25) and 0·31 (sd 0·22) μg/kg body weight, respectively; P = 0·13). These findings suggest that low levels of 25(OH)D3 might be a risk factor for MCT in Labrador retrievers. Prospective cohort studies are warranted.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Joseph Wakshlag, email jw37@cornell.edu
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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