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Dietary modification of potential vitamin K supply from enteric bacterial menaquinones in rats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J. C. Mathers
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Biochemistry and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU
Fresia Fernandez
Affiliation:
Bacterial Metabolism Research Laboratory, PHLS Centre for Applied Microbiology & Research, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JG
M. J. Hill
Affiliation:
Bacterial Metabolism Research Laboratory, PHLS Centre for Applied Microbiology & Research, Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP4 0JG
P. T. McCarthy
Affiliation:
Haematology Research Laboratory, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT
M. J. Shearer
Affiliation:
Haematology Research Laboratory, Guy's Hospital, London SE1 9RT
A. Oxley
Affiliation:
Department of Haematology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne
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Abstract

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Rats given a low-fibre diet based on boiled white rice developed symptoms of severe vitamin K deficiency within 23 d. Inclusion of autoclaved black-eye beans (Vigna unguiculata) in the diet prevented the bleeding syndrome. To test the hypothesis that deficiency resulted from low phylloquinone intake exacerbated by inadequate production of menaquinones by the enteric bacteria, a follow-up experiment was carried out in which groups of rats were given an all-rice diet, a rice+beans diet or a stock diet. Rats on the allrice diet had significantly lower faecal concentrations of the main menaquinone-producing bacterial species (Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides vulgutus) than animals on either of the other two diets. This coupled with the much lower faecal output on this diet suggests that total menaquinone production was low for the all-rice diet. The alterations in faecal flora were associated with several significant changes in caecal metabolism. Rats given the stock diet had much shorter caecal transit times and a considerably greater proportion of butyric acid in volatile fatty acid end-products than did rats on either of the other two diets.

Type
Fat-salnable Vitamins
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1990

References

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