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    Argyri, Konstantina Athanasatou, Adelais Bouga, Maria and Kapsokefalou, Maria 2016. The Potential of an in Vitro Digestion Method for Predicting Glycemic Response of Foods and Meals. Nutrients, Vol. 8, Issue. 4, p. 209.


    Barsan, Cristina 2016. Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology.


    Navarre, Duroy A. Shakya, Roshani and Hellmann, Hanjo 2016. Advances in Potato Chemistry and Technology.


    Pinhero, Reena Grittle Waduge, Renuka Nilmini Liu, Qiang Sullivan, J. Alan Tsao, Rong Bizimungu, Benoit and Yada, Rickey Y. 2016. Evaluation of nutritional profiles of starch and dry matter from early potato varieties and its estimated glycemic impact. Food Chemistry, Vol. 203, p. 356.


    Wang, Shujun Wang, Jinrong Wang, Shaokang and Wang, Shuo 2016. Annealing improves paste viscosity and stability of starch. Food Hydrocolloids,


    Meynier, Alexandra Goux, Aurélie Atkinson, Fiona Brack, Olivier and Vinoy, Sophie 2015. Postprandial glycaemic response: how is it influenced by characteristics of cereal products?. British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 113, Issue. 12, p. 1931.


    Sasaki, Tomoko Sotome, Itaru and Okadome, Hiroshi 2015. In vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glucose response of gelatinized potato starch in the presence of non-starch polysaccharides. Starch - Stärke, Vol. 67, Issue. 5-6, p. 415.


    Lin Ek, Kai Wang, Shujun Brand-Miller, Jennie and Copeland, Les 2014. Properties of starch from potatoes differing in glycemic index. Food Funct., Vol. 5, Issue. 10, p. 2509.


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Discovery of a low-glycaemic index potato and relationship with starch digestion in vitro

  • Kai Lin Ek (a1), Shujun Wang (a1), Les Copeland (a1) and Jennie C. Brand-Miller (a2)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114513003048
  • Published online: 08 October 2013
Abstract

Potatoes are usually a high-glycaemic index (GI) food. Finding a low-GI potato and developing a screening method for finding low-GI cultivars are both health and agricultural priorities. The aims of the present study were to screen the commonly used and newly introduced cultivars of potatoes, in a bid to discover a low-GI potato, and to describe the relationship between in vitro starch digestibility of cooked potatoes and their in vivo glycaemic response. According to International Standard Organisation (ISO) guidelines, seven different potato cultivars were tested for their GI. In vitro enzymatic starch hydrolysis and chemical analyses, including amylose content analysis, were carried out for each potato cultivar, and correlations with the respective GI values were sought. The potato cultivars had a wide range of GI values (53–103). The Carisma cultivar was classified as low GI and the Nicola cultivar (GI = 69) as medium GI and the other five cultivars were classified as high GI according to ISO guidelines. The GI values were strongly and positively correlated with the percentage of in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis of starch in the cooked potatoes, particularly with the hydrolysis percentage at 120 min (r 0·91 and P <0·01). Amylose, dietary fibre and total starch content was not correlated with either in vitro starch digestibility or GI. The findings suggest that low-GI potato cultivars can be identified by screening using a high-throughput in vitro digestion procedure, while chemical composition, including amylose and fibre content, is not indicative.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: K. L. Ek, fax +61 2 9351 6022, email kai.ek@sydney.edu.au
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21CJK Henry , HJ Lightowler , FL Kendall , et al. (2006) The impact of the addition of toppings/fillings on the glycaemic response to commonly consumed carbohydrate foods. Eur J Clin Nutr 60, 763769.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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