Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home

Effect of purified β-glucans derived from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on piglet performance, selected bacterial populations, volatile fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs

  • T. Sweeney (a1), C. B. Collins (a1), P. Reilly (a1), K. M. Pierce (a1), M. Ryan (a1) and J. V. O'Doherty (a1)...
Abstract

β-Glucans have been identified as natural biomolecules with immunomodulatory activity. The first objective of the present study was to compare the effects of purified β-glucans derived from Laminariadigitata, L. hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on piglet performance, selected bacterial populations and intestinal volatile fatty acid (VFA) production. The second aim was to compare the gene expression profiles of the markers of pro- and anti-inflammation in both unchallenged and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged ileal and colonic tissues. β-Glucans were included at 250 mg/kg in the diets. The β-glucans derived from L. hyperborea, L. digitata and S. cerevisiae all reduced the Enterobacteriaceae population (P < 0·05) without influencing the lactobacilli and bifidobacteria populations (P>0·05) in the ileum and colon. There was a significant interaction between gastrointestinal region and β-glucan source in the expression of cytokine markers, IL-1α (P < 0·001), IL-10 (P < 0·05), TNF-α (P < 0·05) and IL-17A (P < 0·001). β-Glucans did not stimulate any pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine markers in the ileal epithelial cells. In contrast, the expression of a panel of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-17A) was down-regulated in the colon following exposure to β-glucans from all the three sources. However, the data suggest that the soluble β-glucans derived from L. digitata may be acting via a different mechanism from the insoluble β-glucans derived from L. hyperborea and S. cerevisiae, as the VFA profile was different in the L. digitata-treated animals. There was an increase in IL-8 gene expression (P < 0·05) in the gastrointestinal tract from the animals exposed to L. digitata following an LPS ex vivo challenge that was not evident in the other two treatment groups. In conclusion, β-glucans from both seaweed and yeast sources reduce Enterobacteriaceae counts and pro-inflammatory markers in the colon, though the mechanisms of action may be different between the soluble and insoluble fibre sources.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effect of purified β-glucans derived from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on piglet performance, selected bacterial populations, volatile fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effect of purified β-glucans derived from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on piglet performance, selected bacterial populations, volatile fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effect of purified β-glucans derived from Laminaria digitata, Laminaria hyperborea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on piglet performance, selected bacterial populations, volatile fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: J. V. O'Doherty, fax +353 1 7161103, email john.vodoherty@ucd.ie
References
Hide All
1Pluske, JR, Hampson, DJ & Williams, IH (1997) Factors influencing the structure and function of the small intestine in the weaned pig. Livest Prod Sci 51, 215236.
2Hampson, DJ (1986) Attempts to modify changes in the piglet small intestine after weaning. Res Vet Sci 40, 313317.
3Williams, BA, Verstegen, MWA & Tamminga, S (2001) Fermentation in the large intestine of single stomached animals and its relationship to human health. Nut Res Rev 14, 207227.
4Hahn, TW, Lohakare, JD, Lee, SL, et al. (2006) Effects of supplementation of β-glucans on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and immunity in weanling pigs. J Anim Sci 84, 14221428.
5Reilly, P, O'Doherty, JV, Pierce, KM, et al. (2011) The effects of seaweed extract inclusion on gut morphology, selected intestinal microbiota, nutrient digestibility, volatile fatty acid concentrations and the immune status of the weaned pig. Animal 2, 14651473.
6Smith, AG, O'Doherty, JV, Reilly, P, et al. (2011) The effects of laminarin derived from Laminaria digitata on measurements of gut health: selected bacterial populations, intestinal fermentation, mucin gene expression and cytokine gene expression in the pig. Br J Nutr 105, 669677.
7MacArtain, P, Gill, CIR, Brooks, M, et al. (2007) Nutritional value of edible seaweeds. Nutr Rev 65, 535543.
8Brown, GD & Gordon, S (2005) Immune recognition of fungal β-glucans. Cell Microbiol 7, 471479.
9Read, SM, Currie, G & Bacic, A (1996) Analysis of the structural heterogeneity of laminarian by electrospray-ionisation-mass spectrometry. Carbohydr Res 281, 187201.
10Manners, DJ, Masson, AJ & Patterson, JC (1973) The structure of a β-(1 → 3)-d-glucan from yeast cell walls. Biochem J 135, 1930.
11Gahan, DA, Lynch, MB, Callan, JJ, et al. (2009) Performance of weanling piglets offered low-, medium- or high-lactose diets supplemented with a seaweed extract from Laminaria spp. Animal 3, 2431.
12McDonnell, P, Figat, S & O'Doherty, JV (2010) The effect of dietary laminarin and fucoidan in the diet of the weanling piglet on performance, selected faecal microbial populations and volatile fatty acid concentrations. Animal 4, 579585.
13Li, J, Li, DF, Xing, JJ, et al. (2006) Effects of β-glucan extracted from Saccharomyces cerevisiae on growth performance, and immunological and somatotropic responses of pigs challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. J Anim Sci 84, 23742381.
14Lynch, MB, Sweeney, T, Callan, JJ, et al. (2010) The effect of dietary Laminaria-derived laminarin and fucoidan on nutrient digestibility, nitrogen utilisation, intestinal microflora and volatile fatty acid concentration in pigs. J Sci Food Agric 90, 430437.
15Friedlaender, MHG, Cook, WH & Martin, WG (1954) Molecular weight and hydrodynamic properties of laminarin. Biochim Biophys Acta 14, 136144.
16Close, WH (1994) Feeding new genotypes: establishing amino acid/energy requirements. In Principles of Pig Science, pp. 123140 [Cole, DJA, Wiseman, J and Varley, MA, editors]. Loughborough: Nottingham University Press.
17Pierce, KM, Sweeney, T, Brophy, PO, et al. (2005) Dietary manipulation post weaning to improve piglet performance and gastro-intestinal health. Anim Sci 81, 347356.
18Pierce, KM, Sweeney, T, Brophy, PO, et al. (2006) The effect of lactose and inulin on intestinal morphology, selected microbial populations and volatile fatty acid concentrations in the gastro-intestinal tract of the weanling pig. Anim Sci 82, 311318.
19Ryan, MT, Collins, CB, O'Doherty, JV, et al. (2010) Selection of stable reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in porcine gastrointestinal tissues. Livest Sci 133, 4244.
20Vandesompele, J, De Preter, K, Pattyn, F, et al. (2002) Accurate normalization of real-time quantitative RT-PCR data by geometric averaging of multiple internal control genes. Genome Biol 3, research 0034.1-0034.11.
21Statistical Analysis Systems Institute (1985) Statistical Analysis Systems, version 6.12. Cary, NC: SAS Institute, Inc.
22Gardiner, GE, Campbell, AJ, O'Doherty, JV, et al. (2008) Effect of Ascophyllum nodosum extract on growth performance, digestibility, carcass characteristics and selected intestinal microflora populations of grower-finisher pigs. Anim Feed Sci Technol 141, 259273.
23Muralidhara, KS, Sheggeby, GG, Elliker, PR, et al. (1977) Effect of feeding lactobacilli on the coliform and Lactobacillus flora of intestinal tissue and feces from piglets. J Food Prot 40, 288295.
24Jørgensen, L, Hansen, CF & Kjærsgaard, H, et al. (2002) Particle Size in Meal Feed to Slaughter Pigs. Effects on Productivity, Salmonella prevalence, and the Gastrointestinal Ecosystem Publication No. 580. The National Commitee for Pig Production, Copenhagen, Denmark.
25Mikkelsen, LL, Naughton, PJ, Hedemann, MS, et al. (2004) Effects of physical properties of feed on microbial ecology and survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the pig gastrointestinal tract. Appl Environ Microbiol 70, 34853492.
26Leser, TD, Amenuvor, JZ, Jensen, TK, et al. (2002) Culture-independent analysis of gut bacteria: the pig gastrointestinal tract microbiota revisited. Appl Environ Microbiol 68, 673690.
27Macfarlane, S & Macfarlane, GT (2003) Regulation of short-chain fatty acid production. Proc Nutr Soc 62, 6772.
28Deville, C, Damas, J, Forget, P, et al. (2004) Laminarin in the dietary fibre concept. J Sci Food Agric 84, 10301038.
29Marounek, M, Adamec, T, Skrivanová, V, et al. (2002) Nitrogen and in vitro fermentation of nitrogenous substrates in caecal contents of the pig. Acta Vet Brno 71, 429433.
30Ahern, PP, Izcue, A, Maloy, KJ, et al. (2008) The interleukin-23 axis in intestinal inflammation. Immunol Rev 226, 147159.
31Ivanov, Frutos II, Rde, L, Manel, N, et al. (2008) Specific microbiota direct the differentiation of IL-17-producing T-helper cells in the mucosa of the small intestine. Cell Host Microbe 4, 337349.
32Maslowski, KM & Mackay, CR (2011) Diet, gut microbiota and immune responses. Nat Immunol 12, 59.
33Russell, JB, Sniffen, CJ & Van Soest, PJ (1983) Effect of carbohydrate limitation on degradation and utilization of casein by mixed rumen bacteria. J Dairy Sci 66, 763775.
34Aumaitre, A, Peiniau, J & Madec, F (1995) Digestive adaptation after weaning and nutritional consequences in the piglet. Pig News Inf 16, 73N79N.
35Bhattacharyya, S, Gill, R, Chen, ML, et al. (2008) Toll-like receptor 4 mediates induction of the Bc110-NFκB-interleukin-8 inflammatory pathway by carrageenan in human intestinal epithelial cells. J Biol Chem 283, 1055010558.
36Barton, B (1996) The biological effects of interleukin 6. Med Res Rev 16, 87109.
37Reilly, P, Sweeney, T, O'Shea, C, et al. (2010) The effect of cereal-derived beta-glucans and exogenous enzyme supplementation on intestinal microflora, nutrient digestibility, mineral metabolism and volatile fatty acid concentrations in finisher pigs. Anim Food Sci Technol 158, 165176.
38Brennan, CS & Cleary, LJ (2005) The potential use of cereal (1–3, 1–4)-β-d-glucans as functional food ingredients. J Cereal Sci 42, 113.
39Sauvant, D, Perez, JM & Tran, G (2004) Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials: Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish. Wageningen, Netherlands and INRAVersailles: Wageningen Academic Publishers.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed