Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-c97xr Total loading time: 0.22 Render date: 2022-05-28T20:46:08.913Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Energy expenditure and physical activity in subjects consuming full- or reduced-fat products aspart of their normal diet

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Klaas R. Westerterp
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg. Maastricht, The Netherlands
P.H.G. Wilhelmine
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg. Maastricht, The Netherlands
Verboeket-Van De Venne
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg. Maastricht, The Netherlands
Carlijn V. C. Bouten
Affiliation:
Department of Human Biology, University of Limburg. Maastricht, The Netherlands
Cees De Graaf
Affiliation:
Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Karin H. Van Het Hof
Affiliation:
Unilever Research Laboratories, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands
Jan A. Weststrate
Affiliation:
Unilever Research Laboratories, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

It has been suggested that energy expenditure is higher in subjects consuming reduced-fat, high-carbohydrate diets than in subjects consuming full-fat, low-carbohydrate diets. In a 6-month randomized, controlled trial, seventeen women and twenty men (age 20–35 years; BMI 22–28 kg/m2)had free access either to a range of about forty-five reduced-fat products or the full-fat equivalents. At the end of the 6 months, energy intake, sleeping metabolic rate (SMR), average daily metabolic rate (ADMR), and physical activity (AO) were measured. The intervention resulted in a mean difference of the change of the fat content of the diet of 6% of energy (P < 0·01) between the two groups. SMR, ADMR and AO were virtually the same in both groups. The results suggest that the change in fat content of the diet has no effect on physical activity and energy expenditure. However, subjects with a higher activity level consumed more carbohydrate (ADMR/SMR: r = 0·49, P < 0·01; AO: r = 0·57,p=0·001)

Type
Human and Clinical Nutrition
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1997

References

Abbott, W. G. H., Howard, B. V., Ruotolo, G. & Ravussin, E. (1990). Energy expenditure in humans: effects of dietary fat and Carbohydrate. American Journal of Physiology 258, E347E351.Google Scholar
Bolton-Smith, C. & Woodward, M. (1994). Dietary composition and fat to sugar ratios in relation to obesity. International Journal of Obesity 18, 820828.Google ScholarPubMed
Bouten, C. V. C., Westerterp, K. R., Verduin, M. & Janssen, J. D. (1994). Assessment of energy expenditure during sedentary activities and walking using a triaxial accelerometer. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 26, 15161523.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dreon, D. M., Frey-Hewitt, B., Ellsworth, N., Williams, P. T., Terry, R. B. & Wood, P. D. (1988). Dietary fat:carbohydrate ratio and obesity in middle-aged men. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 47,9951000.Google ScholarPubMed
Elia, M. (1991). Energy equivalents of carbon dioxide and their importance in assessing energy expenditure when using tracer techniques. American Journal of Physiology 260, E75–E88.Google ScholarPubMed
Hulshof, K. F. A. M., Löwik, M. R. N., Kistemaker, C., Hermus, R. J. J. & ten Hoor, F.(1993). Comparison of dietary intake data with guidelines: some potential pitfalls (Dutch Nutrition Surveillance System). Journal of the American College of Nutrition 12, 167185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hurni, M., Burnard, B., Pittet, P. & Jéquier, E. (1982). Metabolic effects of a mixed and high-carbohydrate low-fat diet in man, measured over 24 h in a respiration chamber. British Journal of Nutrition 47, 3343.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Janssen, G. M. E., Graef, C. J. J. & Saris, W. H. M. (1989). Food intake and body composition in novice athletes during a training period to run a marathon. International Journal of Sports Medicine 10, S17S21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jiang, C. L. & Hunt, J. N. (1983). The relation between freely chosen meals and body habitus. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 38, 3240.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lean, M. E. J. & James, W. P. T. (1988). Metabolic effects of isoenergetic nutrient exchange over 24 hours in relation to obesity in women. International Journal of Obesity 12, 1527.Google ScholarPubMed
Leibel, R. L., Hirsch, J., Appel, B. E. & Checani, G. C. (1992). Energy intake required to maintain body weight is not affected by wide variation in diet composition. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 55, 350355.Google Scholar
Lissner, L., Levitsky, D. A., Strupp, B. J., Kalkwarf, H. J. & Roe, D. A. (1987). Dietary fat and the regulation of energy intake in human subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 46, 886892.Google ScholarPubMed
McNeill, G., Bruce, A. C., Ralph, A. & James, W. P. T. (1988). Inter-individual differences in fasting nutrient oxidation and the influence of diet composition. International Journal of Obesity 12, 445463.Google ScholarPubMed
Miller, W. C., Lindeman, A. K., Wallace, J. & Niederpruem, M. (1990). Diet composition, energy intake, and exercise in relation to body fat in men and women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 52,426430.Google ScholarPubMed
Prewitt, T. E., Schmeisser, D., Bowen, P. E., Aye, P., Dolecek, T. A., Langenberg, P., Cole, T. &Brace, L. (1991).Changes in body weight, body composition, and energy intake in women fed high- and low-fat diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 54, 306310.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Roust, L. R., Hammel, K. D. & Jensen, M. D.(1994). Effects of isoenergetic, low-fat diets on energy metabolism in lean and obese women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 60,470475.Google ScholarPubMed
Tremblay, A., Plourde, G., Despres, J. P. & Bouchard, C. (1989). Impact of dietary fat content and fat oxidation on energy intake in humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 49, 799805.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Van Erp-Baart, A. M. J., Saris, W. H. M., Binkhorst, R. A., Vos, J. A. & Elvers, J. W. H. (1989). Nationwide survey on nutritional habits in elite athletes. Part I. Energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake. International Journal of Sports Medicine 10, S3S10.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Verboeket-van de Venne, W. P. H. G., Westerterp, K. R., Hermans-Lmpens, T. J. F. M. B., de Graaf, C., van het Hof, K. H. & Weststrate, J. A. (1996). Long-term effects of consumption of full-fat or reduced-fat products in healthy, non-obese volunteers: assessment of energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. Metabolism 45,10041010.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Verboeket-van de Venne, W. P. H. G., Westerterp, K. R. & ten Hoor, F. (1994). Substrate utilization in man: effects of dietary fat and carbohydrate. Metabolism 43, 152156.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Westerterp, K. R. (1993). Food quotient, respiratory quotient, and energy balance. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 57, Suppl., 759S765S.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Westerterp, K. R., Verboeket-van de Verne, W. P. H. G., Meijer, G. A. L. & ten Hoor, F. (1992). Self-reported intake as a measure for energy intake, a validation against doubly-labelled water. In Obesity in Europe 91, pp.1722 [Ailhaud, G., Guy-Grand, B.,Lafontan, M. & Ricquier, D., editors]. London: John Libbey.Google Scholar
Westerterp, K. R., Wouters, L. & van Marken Lichtenbelt, W. D. (1995). The Maastricht protocol for the measurement of body composition and energy expenditure with labeled water. Obesity Research 3, Suppl. 1,4957.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access
21
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Energy expenditure and physical activity in subjects consuming full- or reduced-fat products aspart of their normal diet
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Energy expenditure and physical activity in subjects consuming full- or reduced-fat products aspart of their normal diet
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Energy expenditure and physical activity in subjects consuming full- or reduced-fat products aspart of their normal diet
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *