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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Clark, Melissa and Hoenig, Margarethe 2016. Metabolic Effects of Obesity and Its Interaction with Endocrine Diseases. Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice, Vol. 46, Issue. 5, p. 797.


    German, Alexander and Heath, Sarah 2016. Feline Behavioral Health and Welfare.


    German, Alexander J. Holden, Shelley L. Serisier, Samuel Queau, Yann and Biourge, Vincent 2015. Assessing the adequacy of essential nutrient intake in obese dogs undergoing energy restriction for weight loss: a cohort study. BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 11, Issue. 1,


    Brooks, Dawn Churchill, Julie Fein, Karyn Linder, Deborah Michel, Kathryn E. Tudor, Ken Ward, Ernie and Witzel, Angela 2014. 2014 AAHA Weight Management Guidelines for Dogs and Cats*†. Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, Vol. 50, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Deagle, Gabrielle Holden, Shelley L. Biourge, Vincent Morris, Penelope J. and German, Alexander J. 2014. Long-term follow-up after weight management in obese cats. Journal of Nutritional Science, Vol. 3,


    Larsson, Caroline Vitger, Anne Jensen, Rasmus B Junghans, Peter and Tauson, Anne-Helene 2014. Evaluation of the oral 13C-bicarbonate technique for measurements of energy expenditure in dogs before and after body weight reduction. Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, Vol. 56, Issue. 1,


    Serisier, Samuel Feugier, Alexandre Venet, Claudie Biourge, Vincent and German, Alexander J. 2013. Faster growth rate in ad libitum-fed cats: a risk factor predicting the likelihood of becoming overweight during adulthood. Journal of Nutritional Science, Vol. 2,


    Serisier, S. Weber, M. Feugier, A. Fardet, M.-O. Garnier, F. Biourge, V. and German, A. J. 2013. Maintenance energy requirements in miniature colony dogs. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, Vol. 97, p. 60.


    2013. Canine and Feline Gastroenterology.


    Linder, Deborah E. Freeman, Lisa M. Morris, Penelope German, Alexander J. Biourge, Vincent Heinze, Cailin and Alexander, Lucille 2012. Theoretical evaluation of risk for nutritional deficiency with caloric restriction in dogs. Veterinary Quarterly, Vol. 32, Issue. 3-4, p. 123.


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Low-maintenance energy requirements of obese dogs after weight loss

  • Alexander J. German (a1), Shelley L. Holden (a1), Nicola J. Mather (a1), Penelope J. Morris (a2) and Vincent Biourge (a3)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114511000584
  • Published online: 12 October 2011
Abstract

Weight rebound after successful weight loss is a well-known phenomenon in humans and dogs, possibly due to the fact that energy restriction improves metabolic efficiency, reducing post-weight-loss maintenance energy requirements (MER). The aim of the present study was to estimate post-weight-loss MER in obese pet dogs that had successfully lost weight and did not subsequently rebound. A total of twenty-four obese dogs, successfully completing a weight management programme at the Royal Canin Weight Management Clinic, University of Liverpool (Wirral, UK), were included. In all dogs, a period of >14 d of stable weight ( < 1 % change) was identified post-weight loss, when food intake was constant and activity levels were stable (assessed via owners' diary records). Post-weight-loss MER was indirectly estimated by determining dietary energy consumption during this stable weight period. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify factors that were associated with post-weight-loss MER. The mean length of stable weight after weight loss was 54 (sd 34·1) d. During this time, MER was 285 (sd 54·8) kJ/kg0·75 per d. The rate of prior weight loss and food intake during the weight-loss phase was positively associated with post-weight-loss MER, while the amount of lean tissue lost was negatively associated with post-weight-loss MER. MER are low after weight loss in obese pet dogs (typically only 10 % more than required during weight-loss MER), which has implications for what should constitute the optimal diet during this period. Preserving lean tissue during weight loss may maximise post-weight-loss MER and help prevent rebound.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: A. J. German, fax +44 151 795 6101, email ajgerman@liv.ac.uk
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2AJ German , SL Holden , T Bissot , (2007) Dietary energy restriction and successful weight loss in obese client-owned dogs. J Vet Intern Med 21, 11741180.

3J Gossellin , S Peachey , J Sherington , (2007) Evaluation of dirlotapide for sustained weight loss in overweight Labrador retrievers. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 30, 5565.

4DP Laflamme & G Kuhlman (1995) The effect of weight loss regimen on subsequent weight maintenance in dogs. Nutr Res 15, 10191028.

5D Nagaoka , Y Mitsuhashi , R Angell , (2010) Re-induction of obese body weight occurs more rapidly and at lower caloric intake in beagles. J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr 94, 287292.

8AJ German , SL Holden , T Bissot , (2010) A high protein high fibre diet improves weight loss in obese dogs. Vet J 183, 294297.

12M Weber , T Bissot , E Servet , (2007) A high protein, high fiber diet designed for weight loss improves satiety in dogs. J Vet Intern Med 21, 12031208.

14EB Pouteau , SM Mariot , LJ Martin , (2002) Rate of carbon dioxide production and energy expenditure in fed and food-deprived adult dogs as determined by indirect calorimetry and isotopic methods. Am J Vet Res 63, 111118.

15BL Heitmann , L Lissner & M Osler (2000) Do we eat less fat, or just report so? Int J Obes 24, 435442.

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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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