Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects

  • Jonathan M. Hodgson (a1), Shin Yee Chan (a1), Ian B. Puddey (a1), Amanda Devine (a2), Naiyana Wattanapenpaiboon (a3), Mark L. Wahlqvist (a3), Widjaja Lukito (a3), Valerie Burke (a1), Natalie C. Ward (a1), Richard L. Prince (a2) and Kevin D. Croft (a1)...
Abstract

Tea and coffee are rich in polyphenols with a variety of biological activities. Many of the demonstrated activities are consistent with favourable effects on the risk of chronic diseases. 4-O-methylgallic acid (4OMGA) and isoferulic acid are potential biomarkers of exposure to polyphenols derived from tea and coffee respectively. 4OMGA is derived from gallic acid in tea, and isoferulic acid is derived from chlorogenic acid in coffee. Our major objective was to explore the relationships of tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid in human subjects. The relationships of long-term usual (111 participants) and contemporaneously recorded current (344 participants) tea and coffee intake with 24 h urinary excretion of 4OMGA and isoferulic acid were assessed in two populations. 4OMGA was related to usual (r 0·50, P<0·001) and current (r 0·57, P<0·001) tea intake, and isoferulic acid was related to usual (r 0·26, P=0·008) and current (r 0·18, P<0·001) coffee intake. Overall, our present results are consistent with the proposal that 4OMGA is a good biomarker for black tea-derived polyphenol exposure, but isoferulic acid may be of limited usefulness as a biomarker for coffee-derived polyphenol exposure.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Phenolic acid metabolites as biomarkers for tea- and coffee-derived polyphenol exposure in human subjects
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Jonathan M. Hodgson, fax +61 8 9224 0246, email jonathan@cyllene.uwa.edu.au
References
Hide All
Bruce, DG, Devine, A & Prince, RL (2002) Recreational physical activity levels in healthy older women: the importance of fear of falling. J Am Geriatr Soc 50, 8489.
Caccetta, RAA, Burke, V, Mori, TA et al. (2001) Red wine polyphenols, in the absence of alcohol, reduce lipid peroxidative stress in smoking subjects. Free Radic Biol Med 30, 636642.
Chesson, A, Provan, GJ, Russell, WR et al. (1999) Hydroxycinnamic acids in the digestive tract of livestock and humans. J Sci Food Agric 79, 373378.
Clifford, MN (1999) Chlorogenic acids and other cinnamates – nature, occurrence and dietary burden. J Sci Food Agric 79, 362372.
Dalais, FS, Rice, GE, Wahlqvist, ML, Hsu-Hage, BHH & Wattanapenpaiboon, N (1998) Urinary excretion of isoflavonoid phytoestrogens in Chinese and Anglo-Celtic populations in Australia. Nutr Res 18, 17031709.
Dick, IM, Devine, A & Marangou, A (2002) Apolipoprotein E4 is associated with reduced calcaneal quantitative ultrasound measurements and bone mineral density in elderly women. Bone 31, 497502.
Harbowy, ME & Ballentine, DA (1997) Tea chemistry. Crit Rev Plant Sci 16, 415480.
Herrmann, K (1989) Occurrence and content of hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acid compounds in foods. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 28, 315347.
Hertog, ML, Kromhout, D, Aravanis, C et al. (1995) Flavonoid intake and long-term risk of coronary heart disease and cancer in the Seven Countries Study. Arch Int Med 155, 381386.
Hodgson, JM, Burke, V, Beilin, LJ, Croft, KD & Puddey, IB (2003) Can black tea influence plasma total homocysteine concentrations? Am J Clin Nutr 77, 907911.
Hodgson, JM, Croft, KD, Mori, TA et al. (2002 a) Regular ingestion of tea does not inhibit in vivo lipid peroxidation in humans. J Nutr 132, 5558.
Hodgson, JM, Morton, LW, Puddey, IB, Beilin, LJ & Croft, KD (2000 a) Gallic acid metabolites are markers of black tea intake in humans. J Agric Food Chem 48, 22762280.
Hodgson, JM, Puddey, IB, Burke, V, Watts, GF & Beilin, LJ (2002 b) Regular ingestion of black tea improves brachial artery vasodilator function. Clin Sci 102, 195201.
Hodgson, JM, Puddey, IB, Croft, KD et al. (2000 b) Acute effects of ingestion of black and green tea on lipoprotein oxidation. Am J Clin Nutr 71, 11031107.
Hodgson, JM, Puddey, IB, Mori, TA et al. (2001) Effects of regular ingestion of black tea on haemostasis and cell adhesion molecules in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr 55, 881886.
Kivits, GAA, Vandersman, FJP & Tijburg, LBM (1997) Analysis of catechins from green and black tea in humans: a specific and sensitive colorimetric assay of total catechins in biological fluids. Int J Food Sci Nutr 48, 387392.
Knekt, P, Kumpulainen, J, Jarvinen, R et al. (2002) Flavonoid intake and risk of chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 76, 560568.
Kouris-Blazos, A, Gnardellis, C, Wahlqvist, ML et al. (1999) Are the advantages of the Mediterranean diet transferable to other populations? A cohort study in Melbourne, Australia. Br J Nutr 82, 5761.
Kouris-Blazos, A, Wahlqvist, ML, Trichopoulou, A, Polychronopoulos, E & Trichopoulos, D (1996) Health and nutritional status of elderly Greek migrants to Melbourne, Australia. Age Ageing 25, 177189.
Meng, XF, Sang, SM, Zhu, NQ et al. (2002) Identification and characterization of methylated and ring-fission metabolites of tea catechins formed in humans, mice, and rats. Chem Res Toxicol 15, 10421050.
Morton, LW, Abu-Amsha, CR, Puddey, IB & Croft, KD (2000) Chemistry and biological effects of dietary phenolic compounds: relevance to cardiovascular disease. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol 27, 152159.
Nardini, M, Cirillo, E, Natella, F & Scaccini, C (2002) Absorption of phenolic acids after coffee consumption. J Agric Food Chem 50, 57355741.
Plumb, GW, Garcia-Conesa, MT, Kroon, PA et al. (1999) Metabolism of chlorogenic acid by human plasma, liver, intestine and gut microflora. J Sci Food Agric 79, 390392.
Rechner, AR, Spencer, JP, Kuhnle, G, Hahn, U & Rice-Evans, CA (2001) Novel biomarkers of the metabolism of caffeic acid derivatives in vivo. Free Radic Biol Med 30, 12131222.
Scalbert, A & Williamson, G (2000) Dietary intake and bioavailability of polyphenols. J Nutr 130, 2073S2085S.
Shahrzad, S, Aoyagi, K, Winter, A, Koyama, A & Bitsch, I (2001) Pharmacokinetics of gallic acid and its relative bioavailability from tea in healthy humans. J Nutr 131, 12071210.
Shahrzad, S & Bitsch, I (1998) Determination of gallic acid and its metabolites in human plasma and urine by high-performance liquid chromatography. J Chromatogr B 705, 8795.
Youdim, KA, Martin, A & Joseph, JA (2000) Incorporation of the elderberry anthocyanins by endothelial cells increases protection against oxidative stress. Free Radic Biol Med 29, 5160.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed