Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-827q6 Total loading time: 0.214 Render date: 2022-01-17T23:35:47.958Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Protein and energy relationships in the broiler chicken

11. Effects of protein quantity and quality on metabolism*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2007

R. W. Rosebrough
Affiliation:
Non-ruminant Animal Nutrition Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD20 705, USA
J. P. McMurtry
Affiliation:
Non-ruminant Animal Nutrition Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD20 705, USA
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Male broiler chickens growing from 7 to 35d were fed on a diet containing 150g crude protein (N × 6·25)/kg diet supplemented with lysine to equal that in diets containing 166, 183 and 200g crude protein/kg diet (Expt 1). A second group of male broiler chickens growing over the same period were fed on a diet containing 120g crude protein/kg supplemented with lysine, arginine, tryptophan, threonine and isoleucine equal to that in diets containing 144, 172 and 200g crude protein/kg diet (Expt 2). Growth was improved by lysine supplementation but not to the level attained by feeding 200g crude protein/kg (Expt 1). Lysine, arginine, tryptophan, threonine and isoleucine supplementation of a low-protein diet also improved growth, but growth again fell short of that attained by feeding a diet containing 200g crude protein/kg. Plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 and thyroxine concentrations increased and triiodothyronine decreased as the crude protein level increased from 150 to 200g/kg diet. Supplemental lysine did not affect plasma levels of these hormones. Although dietary crude protein levels noticeably changed rates of in vitro lipogenesis, changing either the level of a single limiting amino acid or the levels of several limiting amino acids did not change lipogenesis.

Type
Dietary Effects on Energy Metabolism
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1993

References

Ballard, F. J., Johnson, R. J., Owens, P. C., Francis, G. L., Upton, F. M., McMurtry, J. P. & Wallace, J. C. (1990). Chicken insulin-like growth factor-I: Amino acid sequence, radioimmunoassay, and plasma levels between strains and during growth. General and Comparative Endocrinology 79, 459469.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bartov, I. (1979). Nutritional factors affecting quantity and quality of carcass fat in chickens. Federation Proceedings 38, 26272639.Google ScholarPubMed
Buttery, P. J. & Boorman, K. N. (1976). The energetic efficiency of amino acid metabolism. Protein Metabolism and Nutrition, pp. 197204 [Cole, D. J. A., editor]. London: Butterworths.Google Scholar
Buyse, J., Decuypere, E., Huybrechts, L. M., Kuhn, E. R. & Whitehead, C. (1986). Effect of corticosterone on circulating concentrations of corticosterone, prolactin, thyroid hormones and somatomedin-C and on fattening in broilers selected for high or low fat content. Journal of Endocrinology 112, 229237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, S. D., Watkins, P. A. & Lane, M. D. (1979). Acute control of fatty acid synthesis by cyclic AMP in the chick liver cell: possible site of inhibition of citrate formation. Journal qf Lipid Research 20, 974985.Google Scholar
Cleland, W. W., Thompson, V. M. & Barden, R. E. (1969). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TPN specific) from pig heart. Methods in Enzymology 13, 3033.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clemons, D. R., Seek, M. M. & Underwood, L. E. (1985 a). Supplemental essential amino acids augment the somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor response to refeeding after fasting. Melabolism 34, 391395.Google Scholar
Clemons, D. R., Underwood, L. E., Dickerson, R. N., Brown, R. O., Hak, L. J., MacPhee, R. D. & Heizer, W. D. (1985 b). Use of plasma Somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor I measurements to monitor the response to nutritional repletion in malnourished patients. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 41, 191198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Donaldson, W. E. (1985). Lipogenesis and body fat in chicks: Effects of calorie:protein ratios and dietary fat. Poultry Science 64, 11991204.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Donaldson, W. E., Combs, G. F. & Romoser, G. L. (1956). Studies on energy levels in poultry rations. 1. The effect of calorie-protein of the ration on growth, nutrient utilization and body composition of chicks. Poultry Science 35, 11001204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fisher, H., Griminger, P. & Leveille, G. A. (1959). Protein depletion and amino acid requirement in the growing chick. Journal of Nutrition 69, 117123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Folch, J., Lees, M. & Sloane-Stanley, G. H. (1957). A simple method for the isolation and purification of total lipids from animal tissues. Journal of Biological Chemistry 226, 497509.Google ScholarPubMed
Hanks, J. H. & Wallace, R. E. (1949). Relation of oxygen and temperature in the preservation of tissues by refrigeration. Proceedings of the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine 71, 196200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hsu, R. Y. & Lardy, H. A. (1969). Malic enzyme. Methods in Enzymology 13, 230235.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Huybrechts, L. M., King, D. B., Lauterio, T. J., Marsh, J. & Scanes, C. G. (1985). Plasma concentrations of somatomedin-C in hypophysectomized, dwarf and intact domestic fowl as determined by heterologous radioimmunoassay. Journal of Endocrinology 104, 233239.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Isley, W. L., Underwood, L. E. & Clemons, D. R. (1984). Changes in plasma somatomedin-C in response to ingestion of diets with variable protein and energy content. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 8, 407411.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lauterio, T. J. & Scanes, C. G. (1987). Hormonal responses to protein restriction in two strains of chickens with different growth characteristics. Journal of Nutrition 17, 758763.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leung, F. C., Taylor, J. E., Wein, S. & Van Iderstine, A. (1986). Purified chicken growth hormone and a human pancreatic GH-releasing hormone increase body weight gain in chickens. Endocrinology 118, 19611965.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, R. J. & Herbein, J. H. (1976). A comparison of the enzyme levels and in vitro utilization of various substrates for lipogenesis in pair-fed lean and obese pigs. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 151, 231235.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
May, J. (1978). A radioimmunoassay for 3,5,3-triiodothyronine in chicken serum. Poultry Science 57, 243260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Research Council (1984). Nutrient Requirements of Poultry. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.Google Scholar
Prewitt, T. E., D'Ercole, A. J., Switzer, B. R. & Van Wyk, J. J. (1982). Relationship of serum immunoreactive somatomedin-C to dietary protein and energy in growing rats. Journal of Nutrition 112, 144150.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Remington, R. D. & Schork, M. A. (1970). Statistics with Applications to the Biological and Health Sciences. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Rosebrough, R. W., McMurtry, J. P., Mitchell, A. D. & Steele, N. C. (1988). Protein and energy restrictions in the broiler chicken. 6. Effect of dietary protein and energy restrictions on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and metabolic hormone profiles. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 90, 311316.Google Scholar
Rosebrough, R. W., Mitchell, A. D., Von Vleck, M. F. & Steele, N. C. (1990). Protein and energy relations in the broiler chicken. 8. Comparisons involving protein- and lysine-adequate diets on lipid metabolism. British Journal of Nutrition 64, 515523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosebrough, R. W. & Steele, N. C. (1985). Energy and protein relations in the broiler. 1. Effect of protein levels and feeding regimes on growth, body composition, and in vitro lipogenesis of broiler chicks. Poultry Science 64, 119126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosebrough, R. W. & Steele, N. C. (1986 a). Protein and energy relations in the broiler. 3. Growth and in vitro metabolism in male and female chickens used as parent stock. Growth 50, 6375.Google Scholar
Rosebrough, R. W. & Steele, N. C. (1986 b). Energy and protein relations in the broiler. 4. Role of sex, line. and substrate on in vitro lipogenesis. Growth 50, 461471.Google ScholarPubMed
Rosebrough, R. W. & Steele, N. C. (1987). Methods to assess glucose and lipid metabolism in avian liver explants. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 88A, 10411049.Google Scholar
Tanaka, T., Ohtani, S. & Shigeno, K. (1983). Effect of increasing dietary energy on hepatic lipogenesis in growing chicks. 11. Increasing energy by carbohydrate supplementation. Poultry Science 62, 44504518.Google Scholar
Thomas, O. P. & Combs, G. F. (1967). Relationship between serum protein level and body composition in the chick. Journal of Nutrition 91, 468472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, H., Cree, T. C. & Schalch, D. S. (1987). Effect of a carbohydrate-restricted, calorie-restricted diet on the growth of young rats and on serum growth hormone, somatomedins, total thyroxine and triiodothyronine, free T4, index and corticosterone. Metabolism 26, 794798.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yeh, Y. Y. & Leveille, G. A. (1969). Effect of dietary protein on hepatic lipogenesis in the growing chick. Journal of Nutrition 98, 356366.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access
29
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Protein and energy relationships in the broiler chicken
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Protein and energy relationships in the broiler chicken
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Protein and energy relationships in the broiler chicken
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *